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How not to respond to distress call

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IN many countries of the world, the public telephone network has a single emergency telephone number, sometimes known as the universal emergency telephone number or the emergency services number, that allows any caller in distress to call for assistance.

The emergency number differs from country to country. It is typically a three-digit number so that it can be easily remembered and dialed quickly. Some countries have a different emergency number for each of the different emergency services.

These often differ only by the last digit. In the European Union, Russia, Turkey, Ukraine and others, 112 was introduced as a common emergency call number during the 1990’s, and it is now a well-known mobile telephone emergency number around the globe alongside the North American 911.

In Nigeria, the toll-free numbers to call during emergencies are 112 or 767. The question is: How soon can one get response after dialing these numbers? A Lagos resident, Dorothy George , narrated her experience to The Guardian: “There was power surge in Surulere area of Lagos at about 1.00a.m. It caused a high tension wire to cut into two and burst into flames.

It was quite frightening. All residents of the area and their kids ran outside their homes for fear of their houses being razed by the raging fire. “I decided to call 767 and 112. It was around 10.30a.m., when I had left for work, that a lady returned the call to ask for proper description of the affected area for a distress call made at 1am.

By this time, concerned residents had gone to the Eko Electricity Distribution Company to report and the problem rectified. Meanwhile, another Lagos resident, Maureen Igbokwe, narrated how a house almost collapsed on the occupants and she made the distress call to 112. The response was that help could only be rendered when the building had completely caved in. “I heard a knock on my door at about 11.00p.m. that night.

A lady who in my church and her three kids were at the door when I opened. I later noticed the husband was also there. Meanwhile, an 80-year-old woman, who was the family’s neighbour was with them. They came to sleep in my house.

Their house was sinking and almost collapsing. The heard noises from the cracked wall. The octogenarian said she would die, if she slept in that house that night. I called 767 and the response was that the house had not collapsed and nobody had died. And the question is: When is the right time to call an emergency number, is it after the harm had been done or to prevent or check?

There was a power surge in Surulere area of Lagos at about 1a.m. It caused a high tension wire to cut into two and burst into flames. It was quite frightening. All residents of the area and their kids ran outside their homes for fear of their houses being razed by the raging fire. I decided to call 767 and 112. It was around 10.30a.m., when I had left for work, that a lady returned the call to ask for proper description of the affected area.



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