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Firm keys into agenda on malaria reduction in Nigeria

By Kingsley Jeremiah   |   27 April 2017   |   4:27 am

According to the World Malaria Report 2016 released by the World Health Organisation (WHO), malaria killed 429,000 and infected 212 million people in 2015.

In a bid to support the World Health Organisation’s aim of reducing cases of malaria among most vulnerable people, a leading international company Kantar Millward Brown has distributed Insecticide Treated Mosquito Nets (ITNs) and educated nursing mothers as well as pregnant women to help reduce the disease in Nigeria.

While estimated 212 million new cases of malaria and 429 000 malaria-related deaths in was recorded in 2015 as approximately 90 per cent of the cases and 92 per cent of deaths occurred in the African region, according to WHO, Executive Director, Kantar TNS, Eddington Danda speaking in Lagos during the event insisted that the growing incidents of the menace, particularly in the Sub-Sahara Africa region required urgent intervention to address the situation. Alarmed by the fact that 70 per cent of all malaria deaths occurred among children under the age of five as thirteen countries, mainly in sub-Saharan Africa, accounted for 76 per cent of malaria cases and 75 per cent deaths globally, Danda said the company has decided to focus on children, nursing mother and pregnant women to save the vulnerable group.

“We must not leave the fight to the government if malaria will be reduced, individuals and private organisations need to team up against the menace”, Executive Director, Kantar TNS, Eddington Danda said.

A pregnant women, Gift Emmanuel, who was a beneficial of the initiative urged government to promote schemes that would leave the environment in perfect condition to rid the society of the parasite.

The event, which featured short health talk on malaria prevention and control, a demonstration on how to use the nets, free malaria test and administration of anti-malaria drugs to the communities would be sustained to complement government’s efforts in combating the diseases, the company said.


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