The Guardian
Email YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter
Features  |  Health  

Too much Television leads to social impairment

By Chukwuma Muanya, Assistant Editor   |   14 October 2016   |   2:50 am
Television Addicted Children

Television Addicted Children

Young children who watch too much television are at risk of victimization and social isolation, and adopting violent and antisocial behavior toward other students at age 13, new research indicates.

Results of new study led by Linda Pagani, professor at the University of Montreal’s School of Psychoeducation, Canada, showed that young children who watch too much television are at risk of victimization and social isolation and adopting violent and antisocial behaviour toward other students at age 13.

The study titled “Prospective associations between televiewing at toddlerhood and later self-reported social impairment at middle school in a Canadian longitudinal cohort born in 1997/1998” was published in the journal Psychological Medicine.

“It is unclear to what extent excessive televiewing in early childhood — a particularly critical time in the development of areas of the brain involved in self-regulation of emotional intelligence — can adversely affect social interactions,” said Pagani.

“The detection of early modifiable factors that influence later child well-being is an important target for individual and community health. Since establishing strong peer relationships, getting along well with others, and building a positive group social identity are essential elements in the successful transition to adolescence, we undertook to examine the long-term affect of televiewing in toddlerhood on normal development based on four key indicators of social impairment in children aged 13,” she added.




You may also like