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Let’s Talks About Sexual Liberation

What people have to say about sexual freedom?

 

These days having premarital sex is no longer a shocker.  Our parents and grandparents would probably be disgusted at the topic as it’s considered to be immoral and sinful, but it really doesn’t stop most people from indulging in the practice. In society change occurs according to different global factors such as generational and cultural differences.  Today, women have taken on the idea of sexual revolution or women’s liberation, a concept which particularly deals with women who understand sexual desires as “normal” and  express, and fulfil them without feeling ashamed as long as they don’t harm anybody.

When it comes to sexual liberation there are a few unanswered questions that are worth thinking about.  Should people be free to explore their sexual urges without being in a committed relationship? Should society have a say on what you do with your body? Guardian Life spoke to a few millennials to serve the real tea on sexual liberation.

 

“It’s her body, her rules, as long as you don’t harm anyone in the process.”

In accordance with the natural rights pertaining to human beings, each individual technically bears responsibility over his or her own body, we really can do whatever with our own bodies. But the truth is, promiscuity does expose you to harm because there are risks involved. At the same time, if you can avoid unwanted pregnancy with birth control, stay away from STDs with the use of protection and keep your sexual partners appropriate (e.g unmarried); but let’s look deeper at the social implications.

 

“Just like the master key analogy, I will judge a girl who has a high body count.”

The master key analogy is that a key that opens many locks is a master key, but a padlock that can be opened by any key is a useless padlock. Many modern generational women often view themselves equally to men, according to an anonymous 21-year-old, “No gender has the right to be more sexually free than the other, and promiscuous sex should be seen equally as problematic in both sexes.” Realistically, there’s not a soul out there who isn’t interested in knowing the body count of his sexual partner (as being a virgin is seen as out-dated). But, let’s face it; nobody cares if a man sleeps with half the world, so long as he still looks great and healthy enough to have a family because our society lives according to cultural and religious values and sexual liberation for women just doesn’t fit into that equation.

 

“Times have changed, people live according to their own desires”

In 2017, having premarital or non-committed sex isn’t the worst thing in the world. Both female and male adults are capable of making decisions when it comes to their sex life. Issues usually arise when society has moral expectations on the matter. At the end of the day, although sexual liberation was birthed out of the need to be free, we can’t live in a society totally free of judgement and restrictions.

 

When a 24-year-old male was asked why he would look down on a sexually liberated female, he said, “It’s just the way it is.” Is it? The truth is that everybody lives their own reality and you can’t find a perfect equation that would yield the same outcome for everyone. However, the conflict still remains between self and society on the topic of sexual liberation,and that issue that may never be resolved.

“It’s her body, her rules, as long as you don’t harm anyone in the process”

 

Researchers found that….

Women are becoming more sexually liberated with twice as many partners today as 20 years ago, and four times as many having same-sex encounters.

The average woman aged 16-44 today reports having had 7.7 sexual partners of the opposite sex during their lifetime.

Although men are still the more promiscuous sex, the result indicates the gap between the genders is becoming smaller as women become more adventurous.

In this article:
liberation

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