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100 journalists from 50 countries meet in Seoul for global peace 

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A statement by JACKIE Lee, of the Press and Media liaison of the international NGO, Heavenly Culture, World Peace, Restoration of Light (HWPL), disclosed this.

Amid growing nuclear threats, military conflict and terrorism, about 100 journalists from 50 countries have met in Seoul to promote global peace.

A statement by JACKIE Lee, of the Press and Media liaison of the international NGO, Heavenly Culture, World Peace, Restoration of Light (HWPL), disclosed this.

The office, which is under the UN ECOSOC, said the journalists were hosted to promote peace at the third annual commemoration of the World Alliance of Religions’ Peace (WARP) summit held in Seoul, the Republic of South Korea, from September 17 to 19.

The conference solicited a global peace media network and freedom of press and international peace for media community initiatives. The Chairman of the conference, Man Hee Lee of HWPL, told the participants that the work of peace was not given to an individual or company, but to everyone in the globe.

The guest speaker, the President of Oneness Development Association from Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Rev. Tshuma Masimango Katembo said: “Women were raped in the fields, in the forest, along the roads and in their houses. They have seen how their husbands, their fathers and brothers in law were killed and cooked in their presence and were forced to eat some part of their body.

The Chairman of Alsalam News from Egypt, Kamal Khalifa, said the media had a responsibility and ability to reach out to the public to promote peace. Also, a journalist from Izvestia in Ukraine, Igor Shevyrov, urged international cooperation of the press for peace building.

The Chief Manager of International Press Department, HWPL from South Korea, Ian Seo, said: “A peace media initiative would start with a news platform as a website to concentrate on peace-related issues.”

Also, a journalist at IGIHE Brundi, from Rwanda, noted that freedom of speech in most African countries was still a myth.



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