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EFCC arrests Yero over alleged N700m election loot

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Yero

Yero

Ex-presidential aide, Tukur, in custody

The Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) has arrested a former governor of Kaduna State, Mukhtar Ramalan Yero, for alleged involvement in the election funds said to be shared by former Minister of Petroleum Resources, Allison Diezani-Madueke through Fidelity Bank.

The Guardian learnt yesterday that the former governor who confirmed receiving the money to the anti-graft agency, was involved to the tune of N700 million.

An EFCC source told The Guardian that “the former governor confirmed receiving the money but said it has been shared among party members in the 23 local government councils of the state.”

He further revealed that the former governor who is being detained at the Kano office of the EFCC, was arrested Monday evening in Kaduna following the confession of two personalities, a former Minister of State for Power, Nuhu Wya and Kaduna State chairman of the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP), Haruna Gayya who received the money on behalf of Yero.

“Yero didn’t deny receiving the money. He said it was used for the payment of allowances of party agents and for logistics,” the source stated.

Another source within the commission also revealed to The Guardian that a former Principal Private Secretary to former President Goodluck Jonathan, Hassan Tukur, was also arrested on Monday. Details were scanty as to why he was arrested.

EFCC spokesman, Wilson Uwujaren could also not be reached to give details of the arrests.

It should, however, be noted that the government has been investigating a lot of personalities in connection with various looted funds.

From the arms procurement fund of $15 billion to the N3.5 billion-election fund involving former Minister of Finance, Senator Nenadi Usman and former Minister of Aviation, Femi Fani-Kayode, to the election bribe that involves Diezani -Madueke and Fidelity Bank, the EFCC has quizzed a lot of former public officers.



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