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Rose wine: The ladies’ wine

By Tobi Awodipe   |   30 January 2015   |   10:00 pm

WINE-TABLE

THERE is much more to wine other than drinking it; it is business for a great deal of people who derive livelihood from the different types available in the market.

  Interestingly, the manager of Cheers Winery located on Herbert Macaulay Way, Yaba – Lagos, Anne Roberts, sheds light on wine as a drink and as a business. She goes further to talk about another type of wine that is gradually gaining popularity but is different from the usual red and white wines.                                                                                                                                      

  Robert says that selling wine is quite lucrative, as she does not limit herself to just wine. She sells other drinks including champagne and fruit wines.

  According to her, there are so many good red and white wine products that are not too popular but are splendid and just as good, if not even better than the known brands. These include such brands such as Blossom Hill, Ocean Beach, Montagu, Noble Crew and Castillo that are good and would impress any wine enthusiast.

  She notes that Rose wine is beginning to be recognised among wine lovers. Rose wine is derived from the grapes that are used in making red wines but due to some processes employed in making it, it turns out neither red nor white but just a shade between the two. It is usually pinkish in colour, which could be very pale or very deep, sometimes almost bordering on purple. 

  Continuing, she says that when Rose wine appears light in colour, it is called a ‘Pinot Noir’ and when it is dark; it is called a ‘Malbec.’ 

  Rose wines are usually categorised into still, semi-sparkling or sparkling varieties, depending on the sweetness and the type of grape used in its production. They are usually referred to as a ‘ladies wine,’ because they are generally sweet and contain minimal alcohol. 

  It is also generally believed that Rose is a mixture of white and red wines but Roberts insists that this is not true as they are made from grapes too and only the mode of production differs, which makes it unique.

  Rose wines usually come in bursts of fruity flavours, which tend to be sweet, and this might account for its label as a woman’s drink. These types of wines are great with any meal and are fantastic when used to make cocktails, as they are very versatile: less intensive than the red wine and with more depth than white wines.

  The Rose wine does not mature with age so it is better you consume as soon as possible, she adds.




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