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Trump takes Indiana, Cruz suspends campaign

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Once dismissed as a fringe contender, businessman Donald Trump now is all but certain to lead the Republican Party into the presidential campaign against Democratic front-runner, Hillary Clinton, a stunning political triumph for a first-time candidate whose appeal to frustrated voters was widely underestimated.

Trump’s victory in Indiana on Tuesday and Ted Cruz’s abrupt decision to drop out resolved the Republican nominee for 2016, but it still left the party in a deep state of uncertainty. Some Republican leaders remain acutely wary of the bombastic billionaire and have insisted they could never support him, even in a face-off against Clinton.

Nebraska Senator, Ben Sasse, who has consistently said he could not support Trump, wrote on Twitter on Tuesday that he was being asked if the Indiana results changed his views. “The answer is simple: No,” Sasse wrote.

Republicans such as Sasse worry both about Trump’s views on immigration and foreign policy and his over-the-top persona. Hours before clinching victory in Indiana, Trump was floating an unsubstantiated claim that Cruz’s father appeared in a 1963 photograph with John F. Kennedy’s assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald – citing a report first published by the National Enquirer.

Trump still needs about 200 delegates to formally secure the nomination, but Cruz’s decision to end his campaign removed his last major obstacle.

“Ted Cruz – I don’t know if he likes me or he doesn’t like me – but he is one hell of a competitor,” Trump said of his last fierce competitor, whom he had dubbed “lyin’ Ted.” Trump, in a victory speech that was much lower-key than usual, promised victory in November, vowing anew to put “America first.”

The campaign of Governor John Kasich, who has won only in his home state of Ohio, said in a Facebook post: “Tonight’s results are not going to alter Governor Kasich’s campaign plans.”



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