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ATB Techsoft Solutions wants more recognition for indigenous software

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For the umpteenth time, the need to accord indigenous software better recognition has been canvassed, with calls on the Federal Government to lead patronage.

A leading operator, ATB Techsoft Solutions Limited, believed that software developed in Nigeria can compete favourably well with the foreign ones, stressing that opportunities should be granted to indigenous firms to demonstrate their capabilities.

For years, indigenous software developers have suffered recognition and patronage, resulting in huge capital flights, a development that has remained a major source of concern for players and stakeholders in the sector.

The National Office for Technology Acquisition and Promotion (NOTAP) once stated that organisations in Nigeria spend over $1 billion to procure software yearly.

However, speaking at the unveiling of four-flagship software of Finultimate, Ultisure, Eduware and Ultiflux, ATB Techsoft believed that Nigerian organisations need not spend millions of dollars to procure software abroad.

The company claimed that its software were designed and came to ease Nigerian businesses demand for foreign exchange (forex). According to the Chief Executive Officer of the firm, Abiodun Atobatele, the solutions are built to revolutionalise the software market space.

“The only way we can create thousands of technology jobs in Nigeria is when the government, through enforcement of existing laws and regulations on local content, makes it compulsory for companies to buy software developed in Nigeria by Nigerians,” Atobatele said.

Already, the President of the Institute of Software Practitioners of Nigeria (ISPON), James Emadoye, in an interview with The Guardian, stressed the need to have legislations on the part of government that will adequately improve patronage of local software in the country.

Emadoye said the problem remains largely on Nigerians, which still go to China and other countries to import ordinarily, things that can be developed in the country, “how can we encourage production through that. So, we need legislation to strengthen software development. Aside from that government too must be committed to it.”

The ATB CEO noted that the market enterprise software catered for different verticals of the economy, saying that the company had spent the last seven years developing several software systems through evaluation, design, planning, developing and testing.

According to him, the solutions addressed gaps in the insurance and education industries, as well as in Enterprise Resource Planning for any organisation, which, he said, were delivered as a cloud offering leveraging the Microsoft Azure Cloud Service.



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