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A guide to live in accordance with God’s will

By Margaret Mwantok
24 February 2016   |   5:50 am
AYO Lawal’s Doing the Impossible (GEM Enterprises, Lagos; 2015) is a guide to all those who wish to attain great potentials through obedience to God’s precepts. Lawal provides a series of scriptural backing to further motivate the readers on how to achieve their dreams. Lawal uses simple language for easy comprehension. Each chapter contains a…

Ayo-Lawal

AYO Lawal’s Doing the Impossible (GEM Enterprises, Lagos; 2015) is a guide to all those who wish to attain great potentials through obedience to God’s precepts. Lawal provides a series of scriptural backing to further motivate the readers on how to achieve their dreams. Lawal uses simple language for easy comprehension. Each chapter contains a powerful message on how to take dominion.

Though Lawal’s target readers seem to be born-again Christians, Doing the Impossible, could inspire just about any reader who desires to take charge of his live. Lawal is also authoritative in his writing. He begins by describing the life of the Christian believer in two stages; the sheep stage and the lion stage. He likens both stages to a pregnant woman in labour who has to travail in the sheep stage and thereafter give birth to the lion stage with the arrival of the baby.

The author asserts that travail is part of God’s plan to, in turn, bring on a bountiful harvest to the believer. Lawal gives the example of Jesus Christ who travailed to give birth to the lion nature. In the contemporary world, he mentions people like Martin Luther King Jr, Nelson Mandela, Mahatma Gandhi, as people who “Laid down their lives and future to make civil rights available to disadvantaged individuals, communities and even nations; they travailed to birth their nations”.

Subsequently, Lawal describes the Christian as a lion who cannot afford to be among sheep and do the impossible, born of strength, power, glory, honour, riches and majesty. The author is quick to mention the contrasting similarities of sin and holiness, urging the true believer to do away with sin to enable him do exploits, achieve the impossible so he could stand out in the world.

The author then reminds the reader of the condition of being born-again first, which enables him to do the impossible. According to him, the born-again Christian is bright, bold, brave, bountiful and big, exhibiting true quality of a follower of Christ.

Lawal advises that the believer must identify his lion root and locate it, and then strive to get it. Doing the Impossible stresses that the believer must always thirst after the ways of God through reading and studying, noting, “Readers are rulers. Remember Daniel, a prisoner that later became a Prime Minister in a foreign land. In Daniel chapter nine verse two, Daniel said,

‘I, Daniel, understand by books”. Lawal supports this point with the story of Michael Faraday, the British inventor who left school at the age of 14 to be apprentice at a book binder’s shop. He became an ardent reader of scientific concepts.

The author also harps on love as the ultimate, adding, “Hatred breeds hindrances, love breeds life, fear kills success, faith kills failure. The devil cannot stand a man that is greatly in love with God”. At this point, the author expects the reader to be in dominion, and giving glory to God.