Why FG, architects should promote indigenous building materials

The Federal Government and Nigeria Institute of Architecture (NIA) have been urged to embrace policies that will promote the use of local materials and sustainable building practices.
Minister of Housing and urban development, Ahmed Musa Dangiwa
Minister of Housing and urban development, Ahmed Musa Dangiwa

The Federal Government and Nigeria Institute of Architecture (NIA) have been urged to embrace policies that will promote the use of local materials and sustainable building practices.

A trustee of the Africa Union of Architects (AUA), Tokunbo Omisore, stated this at the NIA 63rd yearly general meeting in Abuja, where the institute’s Gold Medal Award was conferred on him.
[ad]
According to Omisore, such collaboration between the Federal Government and NIA might involve providing incentives for projects that prioritise locally sourced materials and sustainable designs, as well as developing building codes that encourage the use of cost-effective and environmentally friendly construction methods.

NIA president, Mobolaji Adeniyi

He said by adopting these strategies, Sub-Saharan Africa with the leadership of the NIA would resolve the challenges associated with imported architectural materials, thereby promoting affordability, sustainability, and self-reliance within the region’s construction and design sectors.

He urged the government to promote Made-in-Nigeria building materials, provide incentives to manufacturers and discourage tax on imported ones to create employment, improve the foreign exchange and the economy.

Omisore noted that Africa, through the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) agreement, should encourage buying Africa’s needs within the continent to alleviate poverty.

He lamented that Africans, particularly Nigerian architects “have been complicit in promoting a culture of buying what we cannot afford. Our revered buildings are often judged based on the specification of materials and components that are not produced locally but imported. We can acquire these items, but they are beyond our financial means.

“Our economic situation will not improve if we continue to buy what is beyond our means,” he said.

The AUA past president used the occasion to acknowledge the efforts of a foremost Nigerian architect, Demas Nwoko, as one who promoted indigenous architecture. “This year, the Arts and Architecture World celebrated our own Demas Nwoko as the recipient of the Lifetime Gold Award at the 18th Venice Biennial, which took place this year.

“This prestigious award recognises and promotes affordable and indigenous Afrocentric architecture. We can afford to prioritise such architecture, but we hesitate to invest in it.
[ad]

[adinserter name="Side Widget Banner"] [adinserter name="Guardian_BusinessCategory_300x600"]
[adinserter name="Side Widget Banner"] [adinserter name="Guardian_BusinessCategory_300x600"]

More Stories On Guardian

Don't Miss