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Songs of lamentation on Democracy Day

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 Governor Ambode hosting the physically challenged persons to a dinner at the State House...on Sunday

Governor Ambode hosting the physically challenged persons to a dinner at the State House…on Sunday

For many Nigerians, apart from being alive, there is little to cheer about on Democracy Day, which began on Sunday and continued yesterday.
Their seeming apathy is hinged on the skyrocketing cost of living amidst lack of basic infrastructure like water and electricity. To them, the change promised by the present administration is gradually becoming an illusion, as they grapple daily to survive.

There is little or nothing to hold on to, expect maybe, finding solace in worship centres, where messages of hope come from the altar to soothe their dejected souls.

According to a civil servant, Michael Ojekunle, that the Buhari-led government has not moved the nation forward since it took over last year is an indication that there is no hope after all for the ailing nation.

“Not only that, the Eldorado, which the government promised at the time of campaign is fast becoming a mirage, this administration is also gradually plunging the economy into a recession, with immense signs of worse things to come.

“Worst hit is high cost of common essential commodities like tomatoes, garri, rice and even biscuits, which had since skyrocketed out of reach of ordinary Nigerians. Most times, the government looks even more clueless in the face of dire economic challenges that one wonders if there is really any difference between it and the last administration”, he said.

Also a primary school teacher, Odinaka Samuel, said while Nigerians understand that the present administration may not have caused the current challenges in the country, there is a semblance of hopelessness on its part as there are a lot of policy somersaults, which is plunging the nation further into abyss.

To him, there is need to carry everybody along irrespective of political or ethnic affiliation because we are all concerned. The president should be open to constructive criticisms that could save the country.

But a banker, Kayode Andrew, said it is still early days to effectively assess the government considering the time it took to constitute the cabinet. To him, it is a fact that things are hard, Nigerians should pray and support their president to steer the ship of government to the expected Eldorado.

Andrew’s submission also found a tacit support from Mrs. Bola Adebowale, an economist, who believes that there is light at the end of the tunnel. According to her, we are expecting better days ahead and soon we will all celebrate.

However, as Nigerians mark this year’s democracy day, clerics have said all hope is not lost for a prosperous recovery. The pastor of New Dawn Baptist Church, Victoria Island, Lagos, Revd. Samson Aderinto Adedokun, has assured Nigerians that there is hope irrespective of the challenges the nation is presently facing.

While emphasising that it is not yet over for the country, he reminded the citizenry that fighting corruption is not equal to progressively improving the lives of Nigerians, adding that they need to remember that spending all the time on yesterday’s crimes today, means abandoning the seeds for tomorrow’s
development.

“The past is history that cannot be lived in, but government must be strong on rectifying present problems, while providing for the needs of the future.”

Former Primate of the Church of Nigeria, Anglican Communion, Most Revd. Jasper Akinola, said the dividends of democracy are far from the people and government must rise up to this reality.

“Prices of food have skyrocketed and airlines are threatening that they would not come to Nigeria anymore. The monies that have been taken from looters are yet to be accounted for. We cannot see the effect of security votes as well as internally generated revenue. Whether we believe it or not, Nigeria is currently going through famine and there is nothing on ground to cushion the effect. But we put all our hopes on God not our leaders to save us, because man can fail but God cannot.”



1 Comment
  • Mizch

    Woe on those who trust in man! Americans trust in God, Nigerians trust in President Buhari. So the difference is clear.