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Zimbabwe court upholds ban on anti-Mugabe protests

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(FILES) This file photo taken on July 06, 2016 shows a protester shouting anti-Mugabe slogans in front of burning tyres during a demonstration on July 6 2016, in Makokoba, Bulawayo Zimbabwe. Street protests, national work boycotts and internet activism are on the rise in Zimbabwe -- offering hints that opposition to ageing President Robert Mugabe could be building towards a boiling point. AFP

(FILES) This file photo taken on July 06, 2016 shows a protester shouting anti-Mugabe slogans in front of burning tyres during a demonstration on July 6 2016, in Makokoba, Bulawayo Zimbabwe. Street protests, national work boycotts and internet activism are on the rise in Zimbabwe — offering hints that opposition to ageing President Robert Mugabe could be building towards a boiling point.<br />AFP

Zimbabwe’s High Court on Tuesday upheld a police ban on anti-government street protests in Harare after weeks of demonstrations calling for President Robert Mugabe to step down, a lawyer said.

Tendai Biti, the lawyer for a coalition of opposition parties who were challenging the police order, confirmed the case had been dismissed.

The parties are set to appeal the decision in the Supreme Court.

Biti blasted the police ban, due to run until mid-October, as “an arbitrary infringement of people’s rights”.

Police in Harare last month ordered a month-long ban on demonstrations in the capital’s central business district following a string of anti-government protests.

Dozens of activists were beaten and arrested for participating in those marches.

Mugabe, 92, has often used brutal force to silence his opponents, and has warned the protesters they were “playing a dangerous game”.

Opposition to Mugabe’s 36-year reign has grown in recent months with a surge of public demonstrations, triggered by an economic crisis that has left banks short of cash and the government struggling to pay its workers.

Soldiers and civil servants have regularly been paid late this year, heightening pressure on Mugabe, who came to power in 1980 and has vowed to stand for re-election in 2018.

A one-day strike in July, called by trade unions and Christian pastor Evan Mawarire, shut down offices, schools and some government departments.



2 Comments
  • Olovo Obinna

    But is that office mugabe’s birth right….after how many decades

  • UOU

    Black race with all kinds of deficiency, starting from cowardice, weakness in almost all other things human, even arabs have done their own spring, sweeping injustice and evil rulers, europe had a candid history of revolution to clean up their society long time ago, the americas also had theirs, where is blackman’s pride to face, squarely their evil rulers like mugabe and all the satanic civilian despots that abounds in sub saharan africa of, east, west and central africa, populated by black skin?