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Nigerians spend N1.6 trillion on generators every year – NESREA

By Tamarausinla Omomo
20 December 2018   |   11:37 am
The Director-General, National Environmental Standards and Regulations Enforcement Agency (NESREA), Lawrence Anukam, on Thursday said about 60 million Nigerians spend N1.6 trillion in buying and maintaining standby generators every year. Anukam disclosed during a media briefing in Abuja where the announcement of the implementation of the National Generator Emission Control Programme (NGECP), expected to begin…

The Director-General, National Environmental Standards and Regulations Enforcement Agency (NESREA), Lawrence Anukam, on Thursday said about 60 million Nigerians spend N1.6 trillion in buying and maintaining standby generators every year.

Anukam disclosed during a media briefing in Abuja where the announcement of the implementation of the National Generator Emission Control Programme (NGECP), expected to begin in January.

The control programme would be using Abuja, as a pilot study.

The Director-General said the aim of the programme is to control the exudation originating from generating sets used around the country.

He said the target is to see that Nigerians use functional, non-polluting generating set as an alternative source of energy.

“Recent statistics from the Centre for Management Development revealed that an estimated 60 million Nigerians invest about N1.6 trillion to purchase and maintain standby generators annually,” he said.

“The National Generator Emission Control Programme (NGECP) is a strategy aimed at cutting down emission of pollutants from generators,” he added.

Anukam said air pollution, emanating from either vehicular or generating sets, remained a major challenge in the country.

“Many cities around the world, particularly in developing countries like Nigeria, are experiencing rapid growth,” he said.

“Yet, in the absence of adequate environmental policy and action, this growth is occurring at considerable, and often increasing, economic and social costs,” he added.

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