Tuesday, 28th June 2022
<To guardian.ng
Search
Breaking News:

No plans to close UNIMAID over Boko Haram attacks, says Minister

By Njadvara Musa, Maiduguri
29 July 2017   |   3:30 am
Mallam Adamu Adamu, has said the Federal Government has no plans to close down University of Maiduguri (UNIMAID), despite incessant Boko Haram attacks, including the recent one that claimed over 48 lives.

Mallam Adamu Adamu, has said the Federal Government has no plans to close down University of Maiduguri (UNIMAID), despite incessant Boko Haram attacks, including the recent one that claimed over 48 lives.

The Minister of Education, Mallam Adamu Adamu, has said the Federal Government has no plans to close down University of Maiduguri (UNIMAID), despite incessant Boko Haram attacks, including the recent one that claimed over 48 lives, including staff and students of the institution, civilians, security personnel and soldiers in Borno State.

Adamu announced government’s decision yesterday in Maiduguri during a condolence visit to the Vice Chancellor of UNIMAID, Prof Ibrahim Njodi. He also condoled with the university community over the killing of some staff of by Boko Haram terrorists, saying: “The Federal Government does not want academic activities in this institution to be truncated, despite the security situation in the state.

He said: “You demonstrate great courage and resilience to stay here to do your work, despite the security challenges. We commend you and government appreciates what you are doing; even to work in Maiduguri requires courage.”

Adamu, however, noted: “Before I came here, I had thought of closing down the university, but after listening to the Vice Chancellor and seeing what you are doing, I am proud of you. I felt ashamed to have thought of closing the school.”

The minister said he was happy to see that the institution’s stakeholders were committed to working there, despite the security threats, adding: “The Federal Government will not close the university and will provide you with all necessary support.”

He urged the university senate to deliberate on security issues affecting the institution and make recommendations on how best to secure it, pledging more assistance to enhance security and academic activities.

Responding, Njodi said five staff of the institution were killed in the recent Boko Haram, adding: “Our other staffs are still missing, including two lecturers, one technologist and a driver.

“We are seriously concerned about their safety. We have contacted the security to know their whereabouts.” He told the minister that the university had entered into a partnership with the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC) on oil exploration in the Lake Chad Basin in its commitment to contribute to the country’s economic development, despite the odds.