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Borno to raise water tariff by 567%

By Njadvara Musa, Maiduguri
18 September 2021   |   4:05 am
THE Ministry of Water Resources (MWAR) in Borno State is set to increase monthly water tariff by 567 per cent as part of strategies to overcome the challenge of inadequate water supply and distribution in Maiduguri metropolis and Jere Council.

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The Ministry of Water Resources (MWAR) in Borno State is set to increase monthly water tariff by 567 per cent as part of strategies to overcome the challenge of inadequate water supply and distribution in Maiduguri metropolis and Jere Council.

While announcing the planned tariff, yesterday, at a stakeholders’ dialogue towards meeting UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) on water, organised organised by the Small Town Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (STWASH) programme, the Permanent Secretary, Hajiya Mairo Lawan, disclosed that the new monthly water rate would be N2,000 for each household.

She noted that there would be an increase of 567 per cent, saying the Ministry has been collecting N300 monthly water rate for over two decades.

She lamented that the current N300 monthly water rate was grossly inadequate and could not address the challenge of providing potable water across the state.

“Upward review of water rate was inevitable to ensure sustainable supply and distribution of potable water to communities,” she said, adding that neighbouring states were charging households between N2, 000 and N3, 000 tariff monthly for water.

She explained that the factors affecting water supply in the state include security challenges and the destruction of water facilities during the 12-year Boko Haram insurgency.

Mairo added: “Delays in approval for the review of WASH and lack of skilled staff also affected supply and distribution of potable water to communities.

“Today’s programme was included in the state’s 25-year Development Plan Framework and 10-year Strategic Transformation Plan.”

According to a WASH specialist, Dare Oduluyi, the programme was funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) in collaboration with WaterAid and Mercy Corps in Borno, Adamawa and Yobe states.

Oduluyi also added that STWASH is a five-year programme to be implemented with funding from the USAID, Mercy Corps and WaterAid.

“The implementation of the water sector programme is to enhance access to WASH facilities, strengthen WASH governance and promote economic recovery and peace in Northeast,” he said.

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