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Cancer Aware Nigeria, LUTH organise free cancer screening

By Paul Adunwoke
10 February 2019   |   3:06 am
Cancer Aware Nigeria, a non-governmental organisation (NGO), in collaboration with Oncology and Radiology Department, Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), has organised free cancer screening for staff members of the hospital and residents of the area. The screening, which held at the hospital premises, in Idi-Araba, Lagos, at the weekend, was to mark 2019 World Cancer…

Participants at the programme

Cancer Aware Nigeria, a non-governmental organisation (NGO), in collaboration with Oncology and Radiology Department, Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), has organised free cancer screening for staff members of the hospital and residents of the area.

The screening, which held at the hospital premises, in Idi-Araba, Lagos, at the weekend, was to mark 2019 World Cancer Day Celebration.

Clinical Oncologist and Nuclear Physician at LUTH, Dr. Ololade Kehinde said the screening was to create awareness about cancer noting that early detection is key to survival.

Kehinde said: “With early presentation breast cancer is curable but once it is presented late at the stage of three or four it can only be managed for some period of times and it will difficult to cure.

Once breast cancer is dictated at the stage one or two it is very curable because of this, we decided to organize the screening in order to dictate them early and increase the life span of the patients.

Women are expected to go for cancer screening at least once in a month in the two breasts.

There is self-examination in cancer screening where the woman will stand before mirror and check the breasts, if the colour of the skin is changing to orange colour, it shows that cancer virus is there. At this stage the person needs to seek medical attention at the earlier stage.

Cancer Aware Nigeria Executive Coodinator, Tolu Falowo, said her NGO started in 2014 with vision to reduce the rising cases of cancer in Nigeria especially among women.

“We educate women in terms of preventions, symptoms and also on the in importance of early dictation. Many of the breast cancer cases in the hospitals are been presented late leading to increase in deaths, but we want general public to know that cancer is not a death sentence once it is presented early”, she said: