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Sudan: Floods in Sudan put more than 10 million people at risk of water-borne diseases

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HIGHLIGHTS

  • Rains started to subside and flood waters are receding in Sudan, after months of heavy rainfall that left more than 875,000 people affected by unprecedented flooding.

  • Over 10 million people are now at risk of contracting water-borne diseases and 4.5 million are exposed to vector-borne diseases, a 100 per cent more than in April 2020.

  • Meanwhile, a surging inflation is leading to increased humanitarian needs in Sudan and hampering humanitarian assistance when millions of vulnerable people need it the most.

  • COVID-19 transmissions continue and new cases of vaccine-derived poliovirus have been reported. Around 10 million doses of polio vaccine arrived in Khartoum.

  • Humanitarians are responding, but the extremely low funding, especially for health and water, hygiene and sanitation services are hampering aid organizations’ capacity to operate.

Download Report: https://bit.ly/33M5mXJ

EMERGENCY RESPONSE

Floods in Sudan – Situation Report

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Rains started to subside and flood waters are receding in Sudan, after months of heavy rainfall that left more than 875,000 people affected by unprecedented flooding.

  • Torrential downpours, landslides, flash and riverine flooding have killed over 150 people and left a path of destruction in all states across the country, according to the Government's Humanitarian Aid Commission data.

  • More than 30 per cent of the water samples analyzed across 13 states were contaminated and the extensive damage to hundreds of water sources, the collapse of several thousands of latrines increase the likelihood of disease outbreaks.

  • Over 10 million people are now at risk of contracting water-borne diseases, and more than 4.5 million are exposed to vector-borne diseases, an increase of nearly 100 per cent if compared with April 2020.

  • Malaria cases have increased in seven localities of North Darfur and different parts of Sennar State. West Darfur reported nearly 100 cases of chikungunya, and hundreds of cases of viral haemorrhagic fever have been reported in Northern, River Nile, Kassala, Khartoum, Sennar and West Kordofan states.

  • Humanitarians are in a race against time to respond to the crisis and save lives, but the extremely low funding, especially for health and water, hygiene and sanitation services are hampering aid organizations’ capacity to operate.

SITUATION OVERVIEW

Flood waters started to recede in most of Sudan, following several weeks of torrential downpours that have caused deaths, displacement, and massive destructions to key infrastructure and livelihoods across the country.

As of 6 October, 155 people lost their lives and the number of people critically affected reached over 875,000, according to the Government’s Humanitarian Aid Commission. At least 150,000 refugees and internally displaced people are among those affected, according to UNHCR.

More than 82,500 houses have been completely destroyed and there are reports of nearly 92,600 houses damaged, generating dire and urgent need for shelter and household supplies. Several farms are flooded, especially in riverine areas along the White Nile, Blue Nile and Nile rivers, according to WFP, in a country where 9.6 million people are facing severe hunger.

Over 560 schools are damaged and another 60 are being used as shelter by displaced people. This could further compromise the starting of the academic year, already postponed from September to the end of November, due to challenges with resources to adapt the fragile education system to minimize the risks of COVID-19. Access to clean water and health services, in the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic, has been compromised. Thousands of health centres are damaged or non-functional, around 30,000 latrines collapsed and the break of the Bout Earth Dam in Blue Nile State, on 29 July, risks compromising access to water for over 100,000 people, including IDPs and refugees, who rely on it as their primary source of water. The extensive level of damages increase the challenges to prevent and treat possible disease outbreaks. Malaria, dengue and cholera are endemic in several parts of Sudan, and the risk of these and other water-borne and vector-borne disease increases with the floods and stagnant water. The flooding also brings protection concerns, especially amongst children, women, and displaced people. Families who lost everything can be forced to rely on negative coping strategies to survive, including child labour that is already being reported, according to humanitarian partners. The lack of education services poses children at higher risk of exploitation, and the extra burden on affected families also increases cases of violence against women and girls. People living with disabilities or chronic diseases, elderly, pregnant and lactating women also need specific services that are now compromised by the destruction of facilities and reduced services.

The Government and aid organizations are closely monitoring the situation and providing life-saving assistance to people affected. Humanitarians reached over 400,000 people with critical support. But the stock is being depleted rapidly and more support, including from donors, is urgently needed. The Sudan Humanitarian Response Plan for 2020, which seeks US$1.6 billion, is less than 46 per cent funded.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA).


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