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Book charts path to human, organisational growth

By Omiko Awa
24 July 2016   |   1:40 am
Tibetan Buddhism priest, Dalai Lama, is known for his universal aphorism: “Share your knowledge. It’s a way to achieve immortality.” Deacon Moses Obuba Kalu might not have read or heard of this Buddha sage ...

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Tibetan Buddhism priest, Dalai Lama, is known for his universal aphorism: “Share your knowledge. It’s a way to achieve immortality.” Deacon Moses Obuba Kalu might not have read or heard of this Buddha sage, but he surely has some things in common with him: sharing knowledge and giving to humanity.

In his book, Empowerment For Sustainable Development: Consultancy With Proposal Plans And Project, Kalu has proffered solutions through which man can excel in life. This fact-revealing book was recently presented to the public in Lagos. In identifying knowledge as key to the growth and development of any individual or human organisation, the author bases the thematic thrust of the book on a tripod: spiritual, economic and political.

In stressing the import of skill acquisition and the need to embrace changes that would impact on organisation (micro, medium and big), Kalu notes that no one can reach his/her maximum potential without harnessing the trio, which, apart from complementing one another, works in a composite form. Though, he tags the three core elements of the book, as philosophy of ‘The Empowerment Triangle: Spiritual, Economic, Political (TET-SEP),’ he sees these elements as a unit – indivisible and inseparable.

The book begins with Success In Consultancy In The Internet Age and shows how the Internet has given birth to ideas at a global dimension. The author emphasises the need to create a new career through it.

In ‘Empowerment And Cultural Reorientation,’ Kalu enjoins readers never to give up on themselves and on Nigeria. He calls for people to acquire skills that would enable them contribute meaningfully to their various communities while admonishing parents to devote more time for their children. He draws readers’ attention to the period folklores were used to teach morals and advises parent to use the medium to kindle love in the family and pass virtues to their children.

Using the examples of the traditional Ohafia child initiation rites, Kalu narrates how such rites have helped to codify and coordinate the society to date. He informs that apart from building character, such rites imbue deep nationalist feelings on young ones.

Names such as Cyprian U. Agbazue, Chief S.N. Okeke, Prof. Bolaji Akinyemi, Archbishop M.A. Atilade, Pastor E.A. Adeboye and others, the author states that these Nigerians have not only left their footmarks in the country’s Christian evangelism and diplomacy, but have impacted on lives through their leadership skills. Kalu also calls on Christians to be involved in partisan politics at all levels, saying staying aloof would give room for people of disreputable characters to take over governance and introduce different laws.

In his ‘3Triangles of Transformation: Empowerment, Development and Progress (EDP)’ aims at empowering grassroots people to be self-sustaining and to develop at their own pace. He hinges the paradigm on the theory of spiritual, economic and political empowerment, stressing that the spiritual spurs the physical, which influences man to work for the betterment of his society.

With his panoramic view of a plethora of issues in religion and the economy, the author deserves commendation for his foresight. However, some of his developmental theories need further improvement to test their applicability and workability. His efforts comes at a time Nigeria is passing through a rough patch, which entail citizens to adequately equip themselves with knowledge that would not only help in terms of investment, rebranding, marketing, but also in the area of human relations.