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Young artists break tradition in Shout Plenty

By Eniola Daniel
21 September 2022   |   2:37 am
Carving a world of their own through painting and drawing, while interpreting presence in different genres of art, 31 young African, US, UK and Portugal artists who are in their early 20s have kicked

One of the works on display at the<br />African Artists’ Foundation (AAF)

Carving a world of their own through painting and drawing, while interpreting presence in different genres of art, 31 young African, US, UK and Portugal artists who are in their early 20s have kicked off a group show at the African Art Foundation (AAF), Victoria Island, Lagos. The show runs from August 13 to October 1, 2022.

Tagged Shout Plenty, it assembles the polyrhythmic voices of a diverse, yet interlinked continent and its diaspora.

The artists are Blackson Afonso, Sarfo Emmanuel Annor, Nola Ayoola, Samson Bakare, Patrick Bongoy, Nkemka Chinaza, Audrey D’Erneville, Olatoye David, Dodji Efoui, Matthew Eguaveon, Emebiriodo Ugochukwu, Wasiu Eshinlokun, Dan Halter, Chisom Ikeorah “Chi Fada”, Ishaq Ismail, Matt Kayem, Lindokuhle Khumalo, Ayogu Kingsley, Zemba Luzamba, John Madu, Cinthia Sifa Mulanga, Jean David Nkot, Johnson Ocheja, Emma Odumade, Adaeze Okaro, Precious Opara, Esther Onwukamuche, Sandra Seghir, Pierre Segoh, Kenechukwu Victor and Adesola Yusuf.

Curated by Princess Ayoola and Jana Terblanche, the show derives its name from Fela Anikulapo-Kuti’s 1986 LP, I Go Shout Plenty.

This show centres on limitless forms of art making acting as a transmitter for social change.

The over 100 artworks capture contemporary visual culture articulated through fashion, media, sound and music. This includes painterly expression, photography, textile work, assemblage and relief sculpture. Shout Plenty gives voice to the interior lives of a diverse school of artists and by extension their communities.

Storytelling unites these artists and is beneficial in bridging cultural and ideological divides. In this way, artistic practice allows for play and human conception to wander outside the confines of perceived reality.

The curators have assembled artists working across mediums and delivering their intended message with varying degrees of representation and abstraction.

Speaking on the selection process, Ayoola said: “It was not easy, because we do this kind of show every year, it was easy to gather the artists.”

However, added, “we follow these artists over time; so, we know what they are addressing.

“The show is about letting artists express themselves in whatever issue they are addressing. Their works are about religion, politics, fashion and others so, basically, their works have to do with the contemporary issue going on now, all of them are saying something about what is happening this time.”

David said: “I have been through a lot in my life and family has been the only pillar. My work speaks about positivity even though there is negativity in the country, so, I feel it is too much to still speak about negativity, that is why I preach positivity through my work.”

The graduate of Obafemi Awolowo University (OAU) is exhibiting two works.

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