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Deal with unemployment, others to save households, don advises

By Geoff Iyatse
08 November 2021   |   3:56 am
Director of the Emeka Anyaoku Institute of International Studies and Diplomacy, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Prof. Nkemdili Nnonyelu, has attributed the attendant economic and health implications of COVID-19 ..

Unemployment. Photo/VON

Director of the Emeka Anyaoku Institute of International Studies and Diplomacy, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Prof. Nkemdili Nnonyelu, has attributed the attendant economic and health implications of COVID-19 for the high rate of loss of livelihood, urging that steps be taken to address the situation to save millions of households.

Nnonyelu made this known in his presentation as guest lecturer at the third Distinguished Public Lecture Series of the Nigerian College of Accountancy (NCA), the training arm of the Association of National Accountants of Nigeria (ANAN) in Jos, Plateau State.

Speaking on ‘National Security and Economic Rebirth In The Face Of COVID-19 Pandemic: Livelihood Struggles and Sustainable Development, he said the COVID-19 pandemic has proven to be the most disruptive event in humanity, “putting an immense strain on societies and economies globally’’.

He explained that the pandemic has caused considerable human suffering and exposed the limitations of health, education and economic systems around the world.

He added that the realities called for a review and reengineering of the livelihood options available to enable households to cope with the strain.

He examined extensively the options before Nigeria and concluded that economic revival would be unattainable with adequate security of life and property.

He noted that the economic effects of the current insecurity and intra-country violent conflicts in the country had been compounded by the economic and health implications of COVID-19.

“The current level of insecurity in the country may not be unconnected with the level of unemployment and loss of livelihoods in the country. Lack of employment prospects and poverty are implicated in the youth predilection to associate with violent criminal groups. As long as there is a growing number of unemployed youths and very poor deprived people, so long shall the ranks of the criminal group under their different guises continue to swell,” he said

The don referred to a policy framework that encompassed the four key pillars to fight COVID-19 as developed by the International Labour Organisation (ILO). He listed them as stimulating the economy/employment, supporting enterprises/jobs/incomes, protecting workers in the workplace and relying on social dialogue for solutions.

The President of ANAN, Prof. Benjamin Osisioma, said ANAN’s firm belief in education and training was responsible for the various enrichment programmes used to engage students, members and the general public in robust knowledge-sharing.

Osisioma pointed out that in contemporary times, security, economic resuscitation, COVID-19 and other topical issues had continued to spark interest in public discourse and research.

“I appreciate the college for organising a third consecutive successful public lecture and for ensuring that this third edition uses both physical and virtual spaces to reach out to members of the audience,” he said.