The Guardian
Email YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter WhatsApp

Nigeria to save $500 million from fertiliser import substitution

Related


With increased local production of fertiliser expected within the next few weeks, operators in the petrochemical space have said Nigeria would be able to save up to $500million from import substitution and earn about $400million from export of products.
 
Preparatory to the inauguration of its $2billion Granulated Urea Fertiliser complex, the Group Executive Director, Strategy, Portfolio Development & Capital Projects, Dangote Industries Limited, Devakumar Edwin, said the supply of fertiliser from the plant, will be enough for the Nigerian market and neighbouring countries.

   
Edwin noted that the plant has started receiving gas supply from the Nigerian Gas Company (NGC), and Chevron Nigeria Limited (CNL), under the Gas Sale and Purchase was Agreement (GSPA), to supply 70 million standard cubic feet per day (Scf/d) of natural gas to Dangote Fertiliser Limited.
   
The project, which is expected to create thousands of direct and indirect jobs in construction and related fields, will provide a major boost to the agricultural sector by significantly reducing the importation of fertiliser in Nigeria, and ultimately remove the need for imports when plant is in full production.
  
“I am happy that by the time our plant is fully commissioned, the country will become self-sufficient in fertiliser production and even have the capacity to export the products to other African countries. Right now, farmers are forced to utilise whatever fertiliser that is available as they have no choice, but we need to know that the fertiliser that will work in one state may not be suitable in another, as they may not have the same soil type and composition. The same fertiliser you use for sorghum may not be the fertiliser you will use for sugar cane.”
   
He said the Dangote fertiliser project, which is estimated to gulp $2billion is the largest granulated Urea fertiliser complex to emerge in the entire fertiliser industry history in the world, with its three million tonnes per annum capacity.He pointed out that the fertiliser complex, which is sited on 500 hectares of land has the capacity to expand as it is only occupying a small fraction of the allotted portion.
   
Edwin added: “The management of the complex are confident that the fertiliser business will deliver reasonable profit to the company and its shareholders as it is projected that population growth and the need for food production will jack up the consumption of Urea fertiliser beginning from 2020, when production of the production would have commenced in earnest.

“The current consumption of Urea estimated at a dismal 700,000 tonnes per annum by Nigerian farmers is said to be due to very poor usage and is believed to be the cause of poor product yield, which threatens food security in the country.
  
“By 2020, Nigerian population is projected to increase to about 207 million which would lead to increased food production. Estimates points out that around five million tonnes of fertilisers are required per year in Nigeria in the next five to seven years bifurcated into 3.5 million tonnes  of Urea and 1.5 million tonnes of NPK while current production levels in Nigeria are at 1.6 million tonnes  by 2019.”


Receive News Alerts on Whatsapp: +2348136370421

No comments yet