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EU, Germany consider battery manufacturing, export in Nigeria

By Kingsley Jeremiah, Abuja
08 October 2021   |   2:48 am
The Federal Executive Council (FEC) may, in the coming weeks, approve a plan aimed at the production, recycling and exportation of lead batteries in the country.

List gains of energy support programme

The Federal Executive Council (FEC) may, in the coming weeks, approve a plan aimed at the production, recycling and exportation of lead batteries in the country.

The Nigerian Energy Support Programme (NESP) championed by the European Union and the German government disclosed in Abuja that the plan, designed in partnership with the Ministry of Environment if approved, would drastically improve the economy of the country while addressing energy challenges.

Reportedly, the global battery market size is expected to reach $310.8 billion by 2027, the utilisation of lead batteries in Nigeria was put at N85 billion. While the development provides economic gains, the lack of regulations poses huge environmental challenges.

Recall that the EU and German government had extended the support programme, even as the Head of NESP, Duke Benjamin stated in Abuja, that plans are underway to crystallize the lead battery sector in the country.

Overall, the second phase of the NESP already mapped 3,900 settlements and 3.2 million buildings with a 60,000 km electricity grid across 22 states while providing training and policy direction on renewable energy and energy efficiency.

Benjamin disclosed that there are a lot of companies in Nigeria that are already involved in the battery value chain, adding that the target of NESP was to create a framework around the way waste batteries are managed in Nigeria.

“We have supported the Ministry of Environment in the waste battery management policy, which has just been handed over to the Federal Executive Council for approval. So, with that, there will be a structure to manage the private sector that already existed in Nigeria,” Benjamin said.

He described the segment as a lucrative business, stressing that regulation was necessary to ensure that the business is carried out in an environmentally friendly manner.

Head of Corporation at EU Delegation to Nigeria and ECOWAS, Cecile Tassin-Pelzer had noted that the first phase offer programme gulped €24.5 million, with the EU and BMZ contributing €15.5 million and €9 million respectively.

She said: “The programme is a notable example of efficient cooperation among the EU and the Nigerian partners, bringing tangible results to the country.”

Tassin-Pelzer said the initiative aimed at ensuring that the potential of renewable energy and energy efficiency is utilised in the country, adding that the programme supports the Nigerian government in developing sustainable energy policies and regulatory instruments such as the mini-grid regulations, the National Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Policy, and the Building Energy Efficiency Code.