Sunday, 3rd July 2022
<To guardian.ng
Search
Breaking News:

Africare takes malaria prevention campaign to Abuja schools

By Emeka Anuforo
02 June 2016   |   2:06 am
Worried that nearly 30 percent of all malaria infections happen in Nigeria, international non-profit organization, Africare, has taken the malaria prevention campaign to Abuja schools.

malaria

Worried that nearly 30 percent of all malaria infections happen in Nigeria, international non-profit organization, Africare, has taken the malaria prevention campaign to Abuja schools.

Speaking when Africare took a malaria prevention advocacy to Government Day Secondary School, Wuse Zone 3, Federal Capital Territory (FCT) Abuja, officials of Africare said the aim was to teach students health literacy, especially things that they can do to prevent malaria.

The project currently works in 10 schools in the FCT.

Africare Project Manager in charge of the Power Forward at Africare, Terfa Akpoyibo, noted that Africare, through the Power Forward Programme, organized the sensitization programme on malaria prevention.

He described early and accurate diagnosis as the first critical step towards successfully treating individual patients for malaria and effectively tracking and controlling the disease among populations as a whole.

Akpoyibo highlighted how malaria control, treatment and management were essential components of the project.

“We will continue with the community sensitization process across the FCT, believing that eliminating malaria is achievable,” he noted.

Speaking on behalf of the students, Zulayat Mohammed, was optimistic that the programme would expand the knowledge base of the participants

She stressed: “The malaria campaign is really important, because it educate us on how to prevent malaria, it is not only educating, it helps us create awareness, so that the message on malaria prevention would spread wide and far.”

Also speaking, National Programme Officer at the World Health Organization (WHO), Dr. Lynda Ozor, said: “Malaria has a devastating effect on the economy, before now it has been estimated that about N132 billion is lost annually due to malaria. This is due to the nets that are distributed, the treatment cost, the out-of-pocket cost, the lost in manpower, the lost in productivity.

“When you estimate these things, they have a devastating effect on the economy. When one person comes down with malaria, the person doesn’t go to work, check the hours that have been lost, check the productivity that has been lost. So it has devastating effect on the economy.”

In this article