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College seeks high investment in medical education

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Ademola Olaitan said considering the importance of quality medical education in the overall wellbeing of the nation, government should redirect its focus to the sector and give it the well-deserved attention.

National Postgraduate Medical College of Nigeria (NPMCN), Ijanikin, Lagos, has appealed to the Federal Government to invest massively in medical education, particularly in the procurement of modern equipment for effective training of medical personnel and proper diagnosis.

President of the college, Prof. Ademola Olaitan, made the appeal at the 35th convocation ceremony of the college in which 386 Fellows graduated.

Olaitan said considering the importance of quality medical education in the overall wellbeing of the nation, government should redirect its focus to the sector and give it the well-deserved attention.

He said, “A total of 386 graduating Fellows for this year is a worthy achievement for the college and further evidence that it is fulfilling its mandate. With this number, the college has succeeded again this year in saving the nation millions of dollars. It has assisted in keeping needed medical manpower within the shores of the nation and in preventing human capital flight in the medical sector.

“It is the opinion of college that high investments in medical education by government will yield high quality in doctors training and patients care. Top among the investments in medical education will be the resuscitation and funding of Post-Part1 residents, to expose them to recent and improved innovations in healthcare delivery in the developed world. Procurement of modern equipment for diagnosis and treatment will also be a worthwhile investment.”

Emphasising on the need for government to ensure establishment of clinical skills and simulation laboratory in the six geopolitical zones, Olaitan said, “The establishment of a clinical skills and simulation laboratory for training of resident doctors, and for assessments of clinical skills and competencies has always received a priority attention in the college. Funding, however, has been the major challenge.”

Olaitan said the college has recorded tremendous success in the use of Computer Based Test (CBT in its training and examinations, adding that the approval of CBT by the college senate and its implementation, “makes it the first Postgraduate Medical College in sub-Saharan Africa to deploy this secure, easy to administer, global best practice and the gold standard format of examination for which we can raise high our heads.”



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