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Health minister seeks private sector support to succeed


Minister of Health, Prof. Isaac Adewole

The Minister for Health, Professor Isaac Adewole has said the present global economic recession would not make the Federal Government to exclusively meet all the health needs of the nation and her people. 

Adewole therefore canvassed a workable synergy between the management of government owned hospitals and the endowed private concerns towards ending unnecessary medical tourism abroad among some Nigerians.  

At an event marking the achievements of the outgoing Chief Medical Director (CMD) of University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital (UITH), yesterday, Professor Abdulwaheed Olatinwo, the minister, represented by the former CMD of University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, Professor Abiodun Ilesanmi, said only proactive management of health institutions in the country would put Nigeria at par with other Third World countries. 

The minister said, “government alone can’t give us all the enabling environment in the area of quality health services in Nigeria. The world over, health is very expensive but many countries are blossoming in the sector due to their effective partnership with the private sector.‘’

Meanwhile, the Country Representative of World Health Organisation, Dr. Wondimagegnehu Alemu, has said that 14.8 million people are in urgent need of humanitarian support for disease control and health care delivery services in the Northeast.

He said those in dire need of urgent humanitarian support; also include 6.9 million displaced persons.

The people were displaced by the nine-year Boko Haram insurgency; and are currently taking refuge in Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) camps and host communities in Borno, Adamawa and Yobe states.

Dr. Alemu disclosed this yesterday, in the 2017 global health organisation’s report made available to journalists in Maiduguri.

“About 450,000 children, of whom one in every five could die if untreated from Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM) in the Northeast insurgency affected region in 2017.”

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