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Journalists tasked to interrogate issues before publication

By Yetunde Ayobami Ojo
09 November 2021   |   3:22 am
A Non Governmental Organisation, Rule of Law and Anti-Corruption (RoLAC), an agency funded by the European Union (EU) and implemented by British Council, has admonished Nigerian journalists to always endeavour to dig out facts on any issue before publishing.

A Non Governmental Organisation, Rule of Law and Anti-Corruption (RoLAC), an agency funded by the European Union (EU) and implemented by British Council, has admonished Nigerian journalists to always endeavour to dig out facts on any issue before publishing.

Speaking at a training entitled: ‘Media Engagement on the Role of Journalists on Criminal Justice and Anti-Corruption Reform’, organised by RoLAC, in collaboration with the Lagos chapter of Nigeria Union of Journalists (NUJ) for 30 selected journalists covering crime and judiciary, the Lagos Coordinator of RoLAC, Mrs Ajibola Ijimakinwa, said one of the objectives of reporting is to ensure good governance, strengthen the rule of law and to curb corruption.

While she said RoLAC’s four major cardinal objectives are to ensure implementation of the Nigerian Criminal Justice Reform, Access to justice for Women, Children and Persons with Disabilities (PWDs), Strengthening the fight against corruption; Citizens’ Engagement in criminal justice reforms and the fight against corruption, Ijimakinwa said these objectives could not be achieve without a partnership with the media.

In his opening remark, the Lagos Chairman of NUJ, Mr Adeleye Ajayi said successive governments in Nigeria had made efforts to fight corruption and expressed commitment to reform the criminal justice system by establishing anti-corruption agencies with mandates to independently investigate, prosecute and prevent corruption, there is still more to be done in the area of advocacy.

“There is no doubt that corruption has caused terrible drain on public resources and eroding citizens’ trust and confidence in the system.

“I must say that we are happy to partner with the British Council’s initiative on Rule of Law and Anti-Corruption (RoLAC) programme on the role of journalists on criminal justice and anti-corruption reform.”

Ajayi said it is the responsibility of the media is to look beyond press statements issued by these criminal justice institutions and do personal investigation on issues of corruption. It is, therefore, our obligation to ensure we enhance the civil society and public engagement in the fight against corruption and the criminal justice reform process.”