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Lagos communities benefit from free cancer screening

By Paul Adunwoke
07 November 2021   |   2:58 am
In line with the commemoration of Cancer Awareness Month, Lakeshore Cancer Centre, in collaboration with Sterling Bank through its one-woman programme, recently organised free cancer screening

In line with the commemoration of Cancer Awareness Month, Lakeshore Cancer Centre, in collaboration with Sterling Bank through its one-woman programme, recently organised free cancer screening for women in Elegushi and Ekate communities in the Lekki area of Lagos.

He
ad of Strategy Development and Outreach, Lakeshore Cancer Centre, Dr. Oge Ilegbune, reminded participants that October is cancer awareness month, observed yearly.

She explained that they decided to screen Elegushi and Skate women because many women do not take care of themselves. Rather, they devote more time to caring for their children and husbands.

She said a lot of women come down with breast cancer because they are not aware they have it until it develops to the last stage that cannot be treated and so, they die.

She explained that women should go for cancer screening at least once a year, as this would help them detect the ailment early and treat it properly to save their lives.

She said women should habitually check themselves and when they discover any lump on their breasts or when their nipples are bleeding, they should report to the nearest healthcare centre immediately for treatment, as all these are early symptoms of cancer.

Mrs. Ifunanya Ugboko from Sterling Bank said they had found solutions to the things that bother women, such as financial and health issues, among others, and they target mainly women in rural areas.

She explained that it is their Cooperate Social Responsibility (CSR) programme to give back to society.

Ugboko said that during the screening if a woman is discovered to be a cancer patient, there should be a loan to enable her further the treatment.

She disclosed that cancer treatment is very expensive and that low-income women cannot afford it. But once it was detected early, the treatment would be less expensive.

“The cancer screening is free of charge. So, we encourage women to come out and examine themselves because health is wealth,” she said.

Olori Sekinat Elegushi commended the organisers of the programme and urged other organisations to emulate the kind gesture, as the communities are willing to partner with any organisation concerning healthcare development.

“We have educated our women on the importance of cancer screening. We spoke to them in English and Yoruba languages, so that the number of women coming down with cancer will drastically reduce in these communities,” she said.