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Old students want 20% budgetary allocation to education sector

By Eniola Daniel
20 December 2018   |   3:33 am
Oduduwa Secondary School Old Students Association, Mushin, Lagos, has called on the Federal Government to increase the budgetary allocation of the sector to 20 per cent, as well as give attention to technical education in the country. The old students made the call at the sixth reunion held at the Shodex Garden, Town Planning Way,…

Education

Oduduwa Secondary School Old Students Association, Mushin, Lagos, has called on the Federal Government to increase the budgetary allocation of the sector to 20 per cent, as well as give attention to technical education in the country.

The old students made the call at the sixth reunion held at the Shodex Garden, Town Planning Way, Lagos.

Vice President of the association, Obalaja Oyerinde, who spoke at the event, lamented poor quality of teaching and learning in most Nigerian schools, as well as infrastructure decay, adding that quality has gone down significantly compare to what it used to be in the past.

Oyerinde, who graduated from the school in 1993, said: “Importance is given to public schools in those days, unlike now that efforts and the direction of the government are geared towards privatisation of the sector. Emphasis should be laid on public education. Our universities are currently on strike, even the polytechnics just joined. So, I want to plead with the government not to neglect the sector.

“To improve the level of education is to increase allocation to education in the budget. If you want to improve in technology, manufacturing, agriculture and other aspects, then education must be looked into. The government should increase education budget to 20 per cent tomove the sector forward.

Also, a United States (U.S.)-based Anthony Obaika, who graduated from the school in 1992, said: “What is happening in the education sector is a reflection of what is happening in our society. I must say that it’s so sad that everybody now wants to go for shortcut; we don’t follow standard any longer. Corruption has eaten deep into the Nigerian society and with that, they don’t fund education the way it should be funded. Most of the private schools are substandard. As a country, we are not stagnant; it will be better if we are stagnant but we are going backward.

“Things have improved now but the fact remains that the government must fund that aspect to meet up with global standard. I studied Computer Science in University of Benin in 1999 and the first time I used a computer was when I did my industrial training. And I was only allowed to use a computer in the laboratory when I was writing my project but now, we have computer everywhere. So, in terms of technicality, nothing is going on.