The Guardian
Email YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter WhatsApp

Singing helps women overcome postnatal depression, study reveals

Related

Chidinma Ekile. Photo: womenofrubies

Singing helps women overcome postnatal depression, new research reveals.

New mothers who struggle with moderate-to-severe symptoms of the condition recover significantly faster if they sing in a group, a study found.

Although the study did not say why this likely occurs, previous research shows singing benefits depression sufferers by allowing them to express their emotions and aiding relaxation.

The findings were published in the British Journal of Psychiatry.

Lead researcher Dr. Rosie Perkins from the Centre for Performance Science in London, said: “Postnatal depression is debilitating for mothers and their families, yet our research indicates that for some women something as accessible as singing with their baby could help to speed up recovery at one of the most vulnerable times of their lives.”

How the research was carried out. The researchers analysed 134 mothers during the first 40 weeks of motherhood.

The women were divided to receive either 10 weeks of a singing workshop, a creative play workshop or postnatal depression standard-of-care.

In the singing workshops, the study’s participants listened to, and learned, new songs, as well as creating songs about motherhood.

Results also found no difference in the recovery of women who take part in creative play workshops or receive standard-of-care.

Perkins said: “Postnatal depression is debilitating for mothers and their families, yet our research indicates that for some women something as accessible as singing with their baby could help to speed up recovery at one of the most vulnerable times of their lives.”

The chairwoman of the Royal College of Psychiatrists’ Perinatal Faculty, Dr Trudi Seneviratne, welcomed the ‘exciting’ findings.


Receive News Alerts on Whatsapp: +2348136370421

No Comments yet