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Uniform cut-off mark will improve quality of COEs’ intakes, says NCCE

By Abosede Musari
14 July 2016   |   1:12 am
Executive Secretary of the commission, Prof. Monday Tommy Joshua, in an interview with The Guardian, explained that in the past, universities with a higher cut-off mark, picked the best quality candidates while the remnants were left behind for COEs.
Prof. Monday Joshua

Prof. Monday Joshua

The recent introduction of same cut-off mark for all tertiary institutions in the country will improvement in the quality of intakes into colleges of education (COEs) in the country, so says the National Commission for Colleges of Education (NCCE).

Executive Secretary of the commission, Prof. Monday Tommy Joshua, in an interview with The Guardian, explained that in the past, universities with a higher cut-off mark, picked the best quality candidates while the remnants were left behind for COEs.

“Teaching is looked down upon and candidates applying to tertiary institutions hardly chose colleges of education. Those who do, reluctantly do so because they couldn’t get admission into universities,” he said, adding that because of this, candidates seeking admission into colleges of education are ill-motivated from the beginning.

He said this unfortunate scenario may have been responsible for the rise of teachers who have displayed poor professional skills.

With the uniformity in the entry cut off mark, he pointed out, only candidates who have passion for the teaching job would apply to COEs, and this development has the capacity to improve the quality of students in these colleges from the onset.

Joshua, who also spoke on the condition of COEs in the North East stated that at the height of insurgency, some of them closed down, with some loosing up to two sessions in a row.

However, “Life is now picking up in the North East and life is also picking up in our colleges. Some of them lost two sessions, properties and documents. One of them has applied to the commission not to use the rule that says a student must not spend more than five years to obtain the NCE,” the executive secretary said, adding that in the thick of the insurgency, some colleges managed to go on because they were not seriously affected”, he said.

There are 146 COEs in the North East. This includes three federal colleges, nine state-owned colleges, three privately owned and four other institutions awarding NCE and one polytechnic awarding NCE. The number of colleges in the North East constitutes 13 per cent of the total number of colleges in the country.

Currently, the total number of students in COEs in the country is 399,518. Out of this figure, 185, 470 are female students. Those on part-time and sandwich programmes are 51, 868.