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WaterAid advocates budgetary allocation for menstrual hygiene in schools nationwide

By Joke Falaju, Abuja
10 November 2016   |   2:12 am
WaterAid Nigeria has advocated for the budgetary allocation for menstrual and sanitary hygiene in schools so as to help girls remain in school all through the year and not skip school because they are on their menstrual period.
WaterAid Nigeria

WaterAid Nigeria

WaterAid Nigeria has advocated for the budgetary allocation for menstrual and sanitary hygiene in schools so as to help girls remain in school all through the year and not skip school because they are on their menstrual period.

The Acting West African Regional Advocate for WaterAid, Ibrahim Musa, who stated this in Abuja at a Menstrual Hygiene Management Dissemination and Training Workshop for WaterAid West Africa staff and partners said although menstrual hygiene has being domesticated in some school curriculum in Ghana, but the teachers does not have the right knowledge and materials to teach the students.

He therefore appealed to the government is to give budgetary allocation to the ministry of Education and Health to support retraining of teachers who have appropriate knowledge on menstrual hygiene management.

Musa further stressed the need for more budget provision to the core northern areas where there are lots of myths on menstrual management adding that there is also need to carry along the religious leaders to interpret the issues surrounding menstruation correctly.

Ibrahim also appealed to the male teachers to provide physiological support to girls during their menstrual period and not see it as women talk. He said: “Our riding point is to ensure that menstruation is seen as a biological process just like defecation or urination and maintaining hygiene during menses is important for women and girls well being, mobility and dignity as there is need to manage menstruation hygienically.”

He further stressed the need for women and girls to have access to water and adequate sanitation, noting that that is why menstrual hygiene management is important when considering women’s participation in the development process because it is fundamental dignity of women and girls.

He said a study was carried out in Ghana, Niger, Nigeria and Mali while Benin, Cote D’Ivore, Guinea and other some West Africa Countries were selected for advocacy for the project work and it was discovered that menstrual hygiene management is a culturally vexed subject, and approached with different lenses in academic literature due to modernity.

Musa said it was discovered that there is little adherence/reference to some international conventions on non-discrimination against women and girls. For instance, the convention on elimination all forms discrimination against women, the Dakar framework on education for all these policies frown at stigma and discrimination which is still practiced against women and girls.

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