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Travelling To Greece? Here Are Some Historical Monuments To See

By Oreoritse Tariemi
24 February 2022   |   1:29 pm
Looking to travel and explore new cities, Greece is one city to add to your list.  If you're a history buff like me, then you probably know all about Greek mythology, and the tingling feeling to experience these in real life remains unmatched.  So if you appreciate history and culture, Greece is the city for…

FILE PHOTO: View of the town of Halki, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, on the island of Halki, Greece, April 13, 2021. REUTERS/Vassilis Triandafyllou/File Photo

Looking to travel and explore new cities, Greece is one city to add to your list. 

If you’re a history buff like me, then you probably know all about Greek mythology, and the tingling feeling to experience these in real life remains unmatched. 

So if you appreciate history and culture, Greece is the city for you and not just because of its great food, bubbling nightlife and affordability. These are some must-see historical monuments to visit on your vacation to Greece: 

  • The Temple of Olympia Zeus, Athens 

The Temple of Olympia Zeus, Athens  Photo Wikipedia

Landmark for most of Greek mythology and also the largest temple in Greece, the Temple of Olympia Zeus dates back to the 6th Century BC. Initially built with 104 grand columns, only 16 of which stand today, the temple enclosed by Adrian’s Gate also doubles as the birthplace of the Olympic games held every four years. 

The Temple of Olympia is located just 500m (1,640ft) Southeast of Acropolis; this archaeological site primarily dedicated to the Greek god Zeus also housed the magnificent statue of Zeus. The 12.4m (41)ft statue carved by Greek sculptor Phidias showed the Greek God of Thunder seated on a painted cedarwood throne ornamented with ebony, ivory, gold, and precious stones.

Asides holding one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, the Temple of Olympia Zeus also holds other important works of art, including the famous Hermes of Praxiteles and the statue of Nike of Panionios.

  • The Acropolis, Athens 

Parthenon at night on Acropolis at Athens Greece

If you have read the Percy Jackson series, the Acropolis should hold a deeper meaning. 

Notably the most popular Greek historical site around the world, the Acropolis holds significance as a monument of the achievements of Ancient Greek civilizations. Towering over the modern Greek city of Athens, the Acropolis contains the remains of other ancient monuments, including the Parthenon, the Erechtheion, the Propylaia and the temple of Athena Nike. 

An extremely popular site because of its status as an official cultural UNESCO World Heritage site, the Acropolis sees tons of visitors every year, and you should definitely be one of them. 

  • Mycenae

The road to Lion Gate Mycenae Photo Greece Travel Ideas

Another famous centre of ancient Greek civilizations, Mycenae, was a fortified city and home to the Mycenaean civilization between 1600BC and 1100BC. This important archaeological site has been linked to several works of cultural significance, including the Odyssey and the Iliad. 

Present-day Mycenae contains other well-preserved monuments, including the Lion’s Gate, the North Gate and notably the Tomb of Agamemnon itself, a 13BC tomb carved into Mycenae’s hills.

  • Delos

Delos Photo PlanetWare

A small island in the Aegean Sea, Delos held one of the most important sanctuaries in Greece, the sanctuary of the twin Olympian gods Apollo and Artemis. Delos gained popularity soon after the 8th century B.C. as the island became a popular pilgrimage location for people around Greece. 

The island is also believed to have held the treasury of the Athenian League until 454 BC, when it was transferred to Athens, which explains why the alliance was also named the Delian League.

  • Theatre of Dionysus

Theatre of Dionysus Photo TripAdvisor

If arts your thing, be sure to make a stop by the Theatre of Dionysus on your trip to Greece. The 17,000 seater theatre, first constructed in the late 6th century, is regarded as the first sample of Greek theatres and the birthplace of the Greek drama.

Dedicated to Dionysus, the god of winemaking and ecstasy, the theatre was first used as a regular site for theatrical performances of plays written by the great tragic poets, such as Aeschylus, Euripides and Sophocle. While the theatre’s original structure have been reconstructed over time, the biggest part of the theatre was originally made of wood, but it was later rebuilt in stone. In 330 B.C., stone seats were added to host up to 17,000 people. 

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