The Guardian
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Buhari, Akufo-Addo meet to resolve diplomatic row

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President Muhammadu Buhari, late Sunday, met with his Ghanaian counterpart, Nana Akufo-Addo, in Abuja on the way out of the diplomatic row between both nations on account of the closure of Nigerian businesses over fresh startup capital legislation in that West African country.

The disclosure, which was made by the Personal Assistant to the President on New Media, Bashir Ahmad, on his Twitter handle, read: “President @MBuhari receives Ghanaian President H.E. @NAkufoAddo tonight (11:36p.m. on Sunday) in his official residence at the State House, Abuja.”

He, however, did not shed light on the closed-door parley, but informed sources, yesterday, said the meeting was on resolving the crisis.

In recent months, relations between Nigeria and Ghana have strained, beginning with the demolition of diplomatic structures belonging to the most populous black nation in Accra by supposed non-state actors. This was followed by the shutting of enterprises owned by Nigerians amid alleged harassments.

For amicable resolution, Vice President Yemi Osinbajo had attended an Extraordinary Session of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) in Ghana, where, he addressed the Nigerian community in the country. This was after a conciliatory trip by Speaker of the House of Representatives, Femi Gbajabiamila.

During the visit, he labelled “Legislative Diplomacy”, the number four citizen had condemned the action, noting that the new law by the Ghanaian authorities was at variance with the ECOWAS trade protocol on free movement of goods and services within the sub-region. He ended his advocacy with a call for quick settlement of the dispute.

On his part, Minister of Information, Lai Mohammed, accused the Ghanaian authorities of extortion, incessant arrests and activities contravening the Vienna pact.

The Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties (VCLT) is an international agreement regulating accords between states, and it was signed by 45 countries, including the feuding West African nations.


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