Thursday, 2nd December 2021
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CELSIR donates solar power system to correctional centre

As part of effort aimed at ensuring smooth delivery of its ongoing virtual tutorial class, the Centre for Legal Support and Inmate Rehabilitation (CELSIR),

CELSIR donating a 2.8KVA solar power to the Medium Security Custodial Centre, Ikoyi

As part of effort aimed at ensuring smooth delivery of its ongoing virtual tutorial class, the Centre for Legal Support and Inmate Rehabilitation (CELSIR), has donated a 2.8KVA solar power to the Medium Security Custodial Centre, Ikoyi, Lagos.

In an interview with The Guardian, CELSIR Executive Director, Joke Aladesanmi, disclosed that as part of its rehabilitation objectives, the centre through its educational supports project had earlier organised virtual tutorial classes for inmates enrolled for the General Certificate Examination (GCE) at the Ikoyi Custodial Centre.

Speaking further, she said the online class was organised to assist inmates undertaking the educational programme in the correctional facility with quality teaching in preparation for the national examination.

According to her, despite the tremendous impact of the virtual class, the objective has not been met due to frequent power interruptions. “As an organisation that advocates effective rehabilitation of inmates, we have considered it paramount to resolve the challenge by supplying the correctional centre with a Solar Power System to ensure smooth delivery of the online classes,” she stated.

Specifically, Aladesanmi said CELSIR strongly believes that one of the vital ways of reducing recidivism and reoffending amongst inmates is through educational engagement that positively affect their mindset and equips them with knowledgeable strength.

Continuing, she added that inquiry into the average age of inmates in the correctional centres across the country revealed that a large number of inmates are youths in their prime who can still contribute significantly to economic growth if equipped with the right skills, stressing that it is important that the time spent in incarceration be focused on equipping them with life skills that would make reintegration worthwhile.

The executive director further stated that CELSIR’s focus on education stems from ensuring passionate and determined inmates who, despite being in an uncomfortable environment defies all odd to add value to themselves. This, she argued, is a major step to change and such should not be ignored. “We believe that inmates who are enthusiastic to change should be encouraged with the necessary support and skills that would help them in contributing positively to society rather than being a threat,” she said.

Conclusively, Aladesanmi insisted that while CELSIR is passionate about effective legal representation for all inmates, she said, “we believe that the assistance should go beyond the courtroom, hence, we remain committed to providing the necessary social, vocational, and educational support that prepares inmates for their days post-incarceration.”