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Cleric decries mass hunger, suffering despite huge donations

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General Overseer of the Zionwealth Church, Chris Omoshola, has decried the increasing hunger in the country and government’s inability to address the plight of Nigerians despite the lockdown due to outbreak of COVID-19.

Blaming the situation on President Muhammadu Buhari, especially lack of measures to address the situation in spite of the huge donations to assist government fight coronavirus, Omashola lamented that government has no foolproof plans to cushion the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

He said since the right of poor Nigerians to fend for themselves had been taken away due to the Lockdown, it was government’s responsibility to help, but which it had ignored, stressing that God would hold them responsible for the sufferings and frustration Nigerians were currently going through.

He urged Buhari to do something urgently before the situation deteriorated, saying Nigerians were crying, frustrated and hungry.

“In an unjust and unfair society like ours, where the rights of the poor masses are constantly abused, undermined and taken for granted, where the average citizens are deprived of their rights, wellness and citizenry privileges.

“Silence in this instance is a sin! We are all equal before the Almighty Creator. Nigerians are being taken for granted, Let’s not keep quiet,” he said.

He also pointed out that although most Nigerians have cried out about lack of electricity and water challenges, their cries have fallen on deaf ears.

Omatshola bemoaned the rising prices of commodities, scarcity in the makeshift markets and most importantly, the government’s lack of concern.

He, however, commended philanthropists like Aliko Dangote, Femi Otedola, Rabiu Abdulsamad, Mike Adenuga, Tony Elumelu and men of God who have contributed generously towards the welfare of poor Nigerians.

Meanwhile, the Anglican Bishop of Amichi Diocese in Anambra State, Bishop Ephraim Ikeakor, has enjoined politicians, particularly governorship aspirants, to stop the serial abuse of members of the society in the name of offering them palliatives to cushion the effect of lockdown over COVID-19 pandemic.

In a message to the people via his Facebook page, Ikeakor noted that there was a difference between Christian charity and secular humanism, stressing that while the former seeks God’s glory and reward, the latter seeks glory from men and human recognition.

The cleric admonished philanthropists not to give in order to embarrass the poor or score cheap political points, saying apart from incurring God’s angry, it dehumanises the less privileged members of the society.

“Don’t give to embarrass the poor, it makes God angry. Don’t give to collect accolades from men from social media. The poor are God’s special project and assignment to the wealthy,” he admonished.


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