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CMD, others advocate healthy lifestyle to prevent diabetes 

By Paul Adunwoke
17 July 2022   |   2:41 am
Former Chief Medical Director (CMD), Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), Professor of Public Health Medicine and currently Director of the Non-Communicable Diseases Alliance Nigeria, Akin Osibogun has called on well-meaning Nigerians to embrace healthy lifestyles to prevent diabetes and other related health conditions.

[FILES] Diabetes kit. PHOTO: REUTERS/BEAWIHARTA BEAWIHARTA

Former Chief Medical Director (CMD), Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), Professor of Public Health Medicine and currently Director of the Non-Communicable Diseases Alliance Nigeria, Akin Osibogun has called on well-meaning Nigerians to embrace healthy lifestyles to prevent diabetes and other related health conditions.

Osibogun who made the call at Nigeria Diabetes Summit, which was held at the Government Reserved Area (GRA), Ikeja, Lagos, explained that regular physical activities seriously lower the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

At the summit, which theme was, “Improving Management Access to Diabetes Care,” Oshibogun, along with other health professionals explained that steps such as losing a small amount of weight, engaging in physical exercise, quitting smoking, eating more nuts, fruits and vegetables to stay healthy are capable of keeping the doctor away.

They stressed that exercise for 30 minutes daily, five days a week will go a long way in preventing diabetes, adding that parents should strictly monitor their children and help them make positive and healthy changes to give them the best chance of preventing Type 2 diabetes because children also have diabetes.

According to Oshibogun: “When the whole family makes changes together it would be easier to create healthy habits that stick. Parents should get started with these simple, but effective tips for healthy eating, and being active in physical exercises, weight control among others.”

The National President of Health Care Providers Association of Nigeria (HCPAN) Dr. Adeyeye Jimmy Arigbabuwo, said many diabetics also have high blood pressure (hypertension), adding that intake of too much salt results in high blood pressure, which causes damage to the kidneys, heart, brain, and the eyes.”

He noted that high blood pleasure has no signs, or symptoms, therefore, “the only way to know if you have it is to check at every visit to your doctor, or nurse. Reducing salt in your diet can help to reduce your blood pressure. So, do not add too much salt, or salt-containing spices to your food while cooking. Use spices that do not contain salt. For instance, herbs, pepper, onions, garlic, curry, powder, chilli, lemon juice, vinegar, ginger among others.”

“Being active and taking regular exercise lowers blood pressure by keeping your heart and blood vessels in good condition. Regular exercises can also help you lose weight, which will also help lower your blood pressure,” Arigbabuwo said, adding, “adults should do at least 150 minutes, two hours and 30 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity, such as cycling, or fast walking, every week. Physical activities can include anything from sports to walking, and gardening.”