The Guardian
Email YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter
News  |  Nigeria  |  National  

Dogara urges minority tribesmen to evolve ways of preserving their languages

Speaker, House of Representatives, Yakubu Dogara PHOTO: TWITTER/DOGARA

Speaker of House of Representative, Hon.Yakubu Dogara, on Saturday urged minority tribesmen in the country to device ways of preserving their languages to guard against extinction in future.

Dogara gave the advice in Lubo community of Yamaltu-Deba Local Government Area of Gombe state during the launch of New Testament Bible, which was translated to ‘Tera’ language.

He commended the effort of Tera speaking people for taking a bold step to translate the Bible into their dialect, adding that the move would go a long way in preserving their language.

“Language that is not preserved may likely go into extinction and this will affect the unity of the people.

“If you can reason in your own native language, you will interpret the gospel better because the gospel is meant to be preached,” he said.

He further commended the translation committee for a job well done.

In his speech, Gov. Ibrahim Dankwambo of Gombe commended the Tera speaking people for translating the Bible to their language, saying the measure would help preserve their dialect.

Represented by Mr Charles Iliya, the deputy governor, Dankwambo called on other communities to take a lead from the Tera people.

In his remarks, chairman of the occasion, Dr Musa Moda, thanked Dogara for honouring their invitation in spite of his tight schedule.
He said there was nothing that could be more satisfying than reading the word of God in the language one understood best.

Also speaking, Mr Kalagar Lubo, chairman, translation committee, appealed to the public to support the launch in cash and kind.

He said very soon, the committee would commence work on the translation of the Old Testament.

The News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) reports that Dogara and his entourage purchased 500 copies of the translated New Testament Bible for distribution to indigenous Tera people who could not afford it.




You may also like