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GBV: Stakeholders task teachers on code of conduct for safe schools

By Guardian Nigeria
31 August 2023   |   8:37 am
To address concerns over growing Gender-Based Violence (GBV), in schools, stakeholders in child education and protection have tasked Nigerian teachers on the introduction of a code of conduct to reduce case such cases and school drop-outs among others.

To address concerns over growing Gender-Based Violence (GBV), in schools, stakeholders in child education and protection have tasked Nigerian teachers on the introduction of a code of conduct to reduce case such cases and school drop-outs among others.

Chief Executive Officer, (CEO,) and founding member of the development Research and Projects Center, (dRPC), Dr. Judith Ann-Walker, said concerted efforts by stakeholders in the education sector is critical to curb increasing cases of gender-based violence either on the way to schools or in the schools.

She stated this at a Two-day national online conference and panel discussion organised by dRPC in partnership with the United Nations Educational Science and Cultural Organization, (UNESCO), Ford Foundation and the Teachers’ Registration Council of Nigeria, (TRCN), yesterday in Abuja.

She described gender-based violence as a menace that leads to increasing early marriages amongst girls of school age, teenage pregnancies, thereby fuelling cultural discrimination that is incapacitating the ability of the Nigerian girl child to be able to attain her potentials and contribute to the growth and development of her nation.

Represented by Senior Advisor on Education, dRPC, Dr. Judith Giwa-Amu, the CEO noted that the conference theme, ‘The Prospect of Introducing a School Code of Conduct to Address Cases of Gender Based Violence within the Basic Education Schools System-Promoting Cross Learning and a Community of Practices Around Teachers Leadership in Schools Safety,’ will chart a path for safe schools in Nigeria.

“‘The dRPC has partnered with the Teacher Registration Council of Nigeria (TRCN) to facilitate the participation of 25 – 45 teacher’s per center in 3 states in 3 geopolitical zones – Kano (North-West), FCT (North-Central) and Aka Ibom (South-South), on the making schools safe for our children”, She adds.

According to her, nonprofit organizations can align with the nation’s education actors to foster safe learning environments for Nigerian girls in order to promote school completion rate and reduce cases of school dropouts, which she described as the danger to the girl child in Nigeria.

She also urged the TRCN and the Nigerian Union of Teachers, (NUT), to stem out bad eggs in the system by introducing and enforcing the code of conduct mechanism as a way to mitigating the impact gender based violence.

Guest speaker at the conference, Professor Mejai Avoseh of the University of South Dakota, USA, explained that to meet present challenges in the education sector, including the challenge of insecurity, teacher in Nigeria must keep abreast of the changing landscape and find appropriate means of adaptation, including the use of technology.

In his address, Regional Director, UNESCO Dakar Regional Office and Officer in Charge of Abuja Regional Office, Dimitri Sanga, said tracers must “facilitate the creation of collaborative teaching and learning themes to foster an environment of shared roles and learning.”

The safe schools code of conduct targets the establishment of a vibrant community of practice among Nigerian teachers, foster supportive environment where teachers can seek guidance, share experiences and learn from each others successes and challenges as well as onboard the use of technology in teaching, explore digital tools and for effective lessons delivery, among others.

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