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‘HIV killed 346 women in Adamawa in 2020’

By Emmanuel Samiala, Yola
02 December 2021   |   3:55 am
Adamawa State Governor, Ahmadu Fintiri, yesterday, disclosed that Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) killed 346 women in the state in year 2020.

Adamawa State Governor, Ahmadu Fintiri, yesterday, disclosed that Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) killed 346 women in the state in year 2020.

“Despite progress in prevention and treatment, HIV remains the leading cause of death for women aged 15-49 years globally. By the end of 2020, 346 women on HIV drugs died in Adamawa State,” he said.

Speaking in Yola, the state capital, at commemoration of the 2021 World AIDS Day, the governor blamed gender inequality for the high rate of deaths among female victims of the disease.

“HIV/AIDS is fueled by inequalities. It is morally wrong that some people can get treatment and live long lives, while others have no access to health care and die. It is no longer news that my administration has taken concrete and deliberate steps to expand equitable access to quality healthcare in Adamawa,” he said.

To end the disease, the governor said his administration would continue to provide more services in education, health and social protection.

Stressing that universal access to quality healthcare is not a commodity, but a human right, Fintiri pointed out that his administration is bridging geographical and demographic barriers to its attainment.

The governor said he signed into law the Violence Against Persons Prohibition (VAPP) for protection and effective remedies for victims, and punishment of offenders.

“We must collectively end the gender/power imbalances that are driving HIV risk and vulnerability. We must champion gender equality and empower young women and girls to transform our societies,” he said.

Fintiri, who noted that putting girls in schools would reduce their risk of getting infected with HIV, said his government would continue to support free education to encourage female children.