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Nigeria, Cameroon to demarcate boundary as FG tasks states on border disputes

By Ameh Ochojila, Abuja
21 December 2021   |   2:26 am
The Federal Government, yesterday, said it will soon come up with a clear map of demarcation to show the boundary between Nigeria and Cameroun.

The Federal Government, yesterday, said it will soon come up with a clear map of demarcation to show the boundary between Nigeria and Cameroun.

Director-General of the National Boundary Commission (NBC), Adamu Adaji, who dropped the hint at a media parley in Abuja, added that the Federal Government was doing everything within the ambit of the law to secure the nation’s territory.

He faulted the media report that the United Nations was about to delve into the already settled boundary dispute between the two countries.

Adaji clarified that the global body cannot create any entity out of any nation or demarcate any country as been insinuated by the report.

THIS is even as the Federal Government sued for the cooperation of states during boundary delineation to reduce incidence of border disputes nationwide.

It noted that efforts in delineation of boundaries were often hampered by misinformation and misunderstanding on the part of the local communities.

Adaji, who made the appeal in Abuja, stated that the incessant disputes were a result of the way and manner the country was put together by the colonialists, who had no prior appreciation of the national socio-political culture of Nigeria.

He said: “The lack of adequate knowledge of the territory and the people was quite pronounced in the way the territory was haphazardly done by the British colonial administration, which tried to map the country for effective governance.”

According to him, there is already emplacement of pillars in the area for permanent demarcation of the physical borders between the two African nations.

Adaji added that even though the two countries have close ties, the demarcation was for purposes of law, and not division or barrier to interactions in line with relevant regulations.

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