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Again, DSS dismisses claims of wrongdoing on Emefiele’s re-arrest, detention

By  Saxone Akhaine, Kaduna
09 August 2023   |   3:15 am
Department of State Services (DSS) has maintained it did not disobey court orders with its re-arrest and detention of former Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) Governor, Godwin Emefiele, even as it insisted the apex bank boss financed terrorism and laundered money, besides other crimes against the Nigerian State. The agency also condemned criticism of its…

Emefiele

Department of State Services (DSS) has maintained it did not disobey court orders with its re-arrest and detention of former Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) Governor, Godwin Emefiele, even as it insisted the apex bank boss financed terrorism and laundered money, besides other crimes against the Nigerian State.

The agency also condemned criticism of its handling of the matter.

“Whether on Emefiele, Bawa or Kanu, the agency has obeyed judicial orders and handled cases procedurally, and in accordance with the rule of law. Critics are encouraged to be a bit more discerning and up their research capabilities. Doing so will reveal that the agency obeys orders. The Court of Appeal judgment on Kanu is recommended for detailed study,” DSS said in a statement, yesterday, by its spokesman, Peter Afunanya.

It noted: “Maybe, we can decipher the difference between discharged and acquitted and what the use of either or both mean in the final order of a judge. The DSS is an ardent respecter of the law. Anyone may argue this but it is true. It is in this regard that it has applied for either a stay or notice of appeal on some of the matters. One who does not obey the laws will not resort to legal procedures like the DSS has done.”

The statement reads in part: “The agency applied for an ex parte order at the FCT High Court, presided by Justice Edward Okpe (and not Justice Mu’azu as erroneously and massively reported in the media) to detain Emefiele for 14 days. Against the established rules regarding ex parte applications, a lawyer suddenly appeared in the court for Emefiele.

“While the judge did not out rightly reject the DSS’ request, he struck out the motion upon its withdrawal by the agency’s counsel. But this is not without his guidance. Earlier, the judge had drawn the attention of the counsels to Section 293 of the Administration of Criminal Justice Act (ACJA), which also recognises the Magistrate Court as a competent court that can first be approached for an order for custody of a suspect under investigation.

In other words, the agency, having taken the hint of the court, took the right steps. What transpired at the court was, thereafter, variously misrepresented by some mischief makers.

“Part of the disinformation is to the effect that the court ‘struck out the application and said it was an abuse of judicial process.’ That was not what the court said. What Justice Okpe said was ‘the applicant, having withdrawn the application, same is hereby struck out.’ That was all. The court records are there. But purveyors of fake news distorted the message to suit their intent; just to make the agency look bad – a sort of giving the dog a bad name in order to hang it.”

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