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Professionalism will be top priority in 2022, says maritime body

By Guardian Nigeria
30 December 2021   |   1:40 am
Council of Maritime Transport Union Associations (COMTUA) says enhancing professionalism in all its operations will be top priority in 2022.

Council of Maritime Transport Union Associations (COMTUA) says enhancing professionalism in all its operations will be top priority in 2022.

President of COMTUA, Mr. Yinka Aroyewun, said this in Lagos, yesterday. He said the association’s top priority in 2022 includes ensuring members’ vehicles are in good condition and enforcement of traffic rules and regulations to ensure an accident free society.

He said: “Any vehicle that is not roadworthy is not certified by government. So, if anybody is associating accidents with vehicles’ roadworthiness certificate, they should not only blame the truck owners or drivers. The government should also share in the blame because bad roads are major causes of accidents in some instances.

“Apart from the roadworthiness checks of federal and Lagos State governments, Nigerian Ports Authority (NPA) also performs checks and all these are paid for,” he said.

Aroyewun noted that the council ensures vehicles using the road are worthy, except for those that are compromised. He said the council is doing everything possible to ensure that even when agencies of government compromise, truckers are not allowed to do so.

The council will also prioritise welfare of members and ensure an enabling environment for businesses, he said, stressing that convenience and a seamless environment impact positively on cost of goods in the market.

“We will all bear the consequences of buying at high prices if the business environment is not favourable, as most imported goods will not get to the warehouse without the inclusion of drivers. It is the responsibility of our members to transport them to the warehouse and to the doorsteps of the users.

“On the other hand, agencies of government that are meant to enforce the law, in most cases, work against the law. They partner with criminals and hoodlums on the road. There are instances when hoodlums loosen brakes, unknown to the driver, so that the vehicle breaks down. And when this happens, they will not allow the driver or conductor to fix the problem,” he said.

He added: “We are appealing to government to provide an enabling environment, so that the sector can thrive and contribute to the economy.”

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