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Regular power collapse indicative of APC’s failure, HURIWA insists

By Ernest Nzor (Abuja) and Silver Nwokoro (Lagos)
18 March 2022   |   2:40 am
The Human Rights Writers Association of Nigeria (HURIWA) has said the two national power grid collapses within 48 hours were indicative of the end of the All Progressives Congress

Electricity grid. PHOTO: www.iroy.

Experts deplore democracy, electioneering in Nigeria

The Human Rights Writers Association of Nigeria (HURIWA) has said the two national power grid collapses within 48 hours were indicative of the end of the All Progressives Congress (APC) administration and perhaps, the existence of some elements poised at destabilising Nigeria for a “military takeover.”

In a statement yesterday in Abuja, by its National Coordinator, Comrade Emmanuel Onwubiko, the group regretted that despite the campaign promises of the APC in 2015 to provide a steady power supply for Nigerians, the government has “failed woefully and compounded the country’s electricity woes.”

It lamented that amid the billions of Naira spent on the power sector by the President Muhammadu Buhari government, Nigerians had kept wallowing in epileptic energy supply.

HOWEVER, the Centre for Constitutionalism and Demilitarisation (CENCOD) Diaspora has decried the state of democracy and the electoral process in the country.

At a round table, yesterday, in Ikeja, Lagos, a professor at the Lagos State University, Sylvester Odion Akhaine, said election rigging, electoral violence, political assassination, lack of party internal democracy, money politics, godfatherism and parties without ideologies were factors negatively impacting democratic progress.

He stressed that the incumbent’s control of state security apparatuses, grassroots structures, institutions such as market traders and transport associations were variables that influence election results.

His words: “In 2018, Nigeria became the poverty capital of the world with over 80 million people living in extreme poverty, despite its abundance of natural resources.”

This justifies the fact that social justice and basic social amenities are lacking in the country, even as politicians and government officials continued to live in affluence. The reason for this is partly widespread corruption with impunity. According to Chatham House, between 1960, when Nigeria gained independence and 2014, about $582 billion has been stolen from the country.”

Comparing Nigeria’s electoral system with Germany, member, CENCOD, Osagie Idehen noted: “You don’t need to have up to $500 or Euro to go into politics or to run an for an elective office. Internal democracy is absolutely guaranteed. Before you emerge, you don’t need to spend anything, the party takes care of your election expenses right from the first day you indicate intention.”

On the way forward, another member, CENCOD, Dr. Adeyinka Olarinmoye, said people of integrity must be active in politics.

To yet another CENCOD member, Ridwan Suliamon, Nigerians should be hopeful of a better nation.

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