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Rescue Chibok girls or resign, parents tell Buhari

By Oludare Richards Abuja
26 August 2016   |   6:21 am
Parents of abducted Chibok girls yesterday asked President Muhammadu Buhari to rescue them or resign.
#BringBackOurGirls campaigners’ Leader, Dr. Oby Ezekwesili (left) British High Commissioner, Paul Arkwright and Hajia Fatima Abbakaka during the campaigners protest at the United Kingdom embassy in Abuja…yesterday. PHOTO PHILIP OJISUA

#BringBackOurGirls campaigners’ Leader, Dr. Oby Ezekwesili (left) British High Commissioner, Paul Arkwright and Hajia Fatima Abbakaka during the campaigners protest at the United Kingdom embassy in Abuja…yesterday. PHOTO PHILIP OJISUA

Ezekwesili wants poor welfare of troops fighting B’Haram probed

Parents of abducted Chibok girls yesterday asked President Muhammadu Buhari to rescue them or resign.

Head of the Chibok Parents, Reverend Enoch Mark, accused government of abandoning their daughters to suffer in captivity. He spoke at the truncated march of the #BringBackOurGirls advocacy group and some parents to Aso Rock Villa yesterday.

Personnel of the Nigerian Police Force, Department of State Services (DSS) and some other security operatives, in similar fashion as on Monday, maintained a human barricade, preventing them access to the Presidential Villa.

The group had on Monday promised to return for the march in 72 hours unless concrete actions or pronouncement came from the Presidency.

Mark, father of two of the girls, said Buhari had failed the Chibok people who voted for him in 2015 with the hope that he would ensure the return of the girls.

“Many Chibok parents voted you because we believed that you would ensure the return of our daughters. You promised us that you are a military man and that you cannot lie. You said the war will not be over until the girls are back,” Mark said.

Also, president of Chibok-Kibaku Area Development Association (KADA), Tsambido Hosea Abana, called on the Federal Government to “quickly negotiate” the release of the girls since it has announced on different platforms that the war on terror has been won, and so can negotiate from a position of strength.

KADA described as diversionary the exposure of Amina Ali Nkeki to the media. It alleged contrary to association’s advice to the Office of the National Security Adviser (ONSA), she made unguarded statements.

Oby Ezekwesili, a former education minister and chieftain of the group expressed sadness over reports of poor treatment of troops at the frontlines, especially emoluments.

This, Ezekwesili said, “is unacceptable and we call for an investigation.”
“At this time of immense sacrifice from our troops on the frontline, it is important to prioritize their welfare and needs, ensuring that they have no cause to complain or worry about basic needs as they serve their nation to rout the insurgents,” she said.

The group later visited the British High Commissioner, Paul Arkwright, urging London to support the Nigerian Army, especially with intelligence needed to locate the girls.

Mr. Arkwright said: “The UK stands in solidarity with Chibok. We are determined to do whatever we can to help find the girls. We understand how important that is, not just in Nigeria but also globally. We will do everything we can, including with the Nigerian government and the president to help find the girls.”