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Stakeholders canvass continuous innovation to improve electoral system

By Kehinde Olatunji 
06 December 2023   |   4:07 am
Abuja Literacy Society has said that if the Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC) persists in the usage of technology to drive the country’s electoral system, it will get it right in future elections.

An Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC) official .Photo by Patrick Meinhardt / AFP)

Abuja Literacy Society has said that if the Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC) persists in the usage of technology to drive the country’s electoral system, it will get it right in future elections.

 
The Chairman, Board of Trustees, Ferdinand Agu, who made this known while delivering a lecture entitled ‘Leveraging Technology in Leadership’ at the induction and award of Fellowship of the Professional Leadership Practitioners Institute in Lagos, said INEC should follow the example of financial institutions that persisted in the usage of technology in their cashless policy, which is already yielding fruits.
 
Agu, who said the use of tech is important for any successful activity nowadays, noted that INEC raised people’s hope when it promised to use technology in the 2023 elections.
 
Nigerians, he added, were, however, shocked at what happened during the election. Agu explained: “Look at INEC in the last election. Eight years ago, INEC introduced smart card readers. Some people complained that it suppressed votes in some places, but Nigerians bought into it. This is a very popular idea to leverage technology in something that affects all Nigerians. Eight years down the road, the National Assembly allocated billions of naira and they tried it in some states. INEC assured us; everybody was expectant.”

On the day of the election, what happened is known to everybody. All of a sudden our best chance to leverage technology in leadership on one issue that virtually affects all Nigerians collapsed.
  
“Our problem is not in the private sector; it is in the public sector, when we talk of application of technology. If you remember, the former Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) Governor, Lamido Sanusi, popularised the cashless system. It is still an ongoing thing. It looks very inconvenient, but if we look back now, that should be the most consequential action of Sanusi as CBN Governor because, gradually and steadily, we are moving into a cashless economy. Despite the challenges that it produced, somehow the people driving it persist.”
  
He asserted that if INEC could do what the financial institutions did, despite initial hiccups it would get it right. 
  
The Director-General/Chief Executive Officer of the institute, Dr Nathan Obasi, expressed happiness with the progress being made by the institute, as most of its members now occupy leadership positions across the country.

 

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