Friday, 3rd December 2021
<To guardian.ng
Search
Breaking News:

UBTH moves against blood clot-related deaths

By Adaku Onyenucheya
01 November 2021   |   3:13 am
Following reports that blood clot within the veins, referred to in medical field, as Venous Thromboembolism (VTE), remains the leading cause of preventable deaths in medical facilities

University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH)

Following reports that blood clot within the veins, referred to in medical field, as Venous Thromboembolism (VTE), remains the leading cause of preventable deaths in medical facilities, the University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH) has begun sensitisation of staff and patients on the deadly condition.

The campaign, which held at the weekend in the Edo State capital to commemorate the 2021 World Thrombosis Day, was to increase global awareness on the causes, risk factors, signs, symptoms, prevention and treatment of disease.

In his remarks, UBTH’s Chief Medical Director (CMD), Prof. Darlington Obaseki, described thrombosis as an abnormal blood clot in the vessels and a potential dangerous condition that could lead to heart failure and, stroke, identifying it as commonest cause of death.

He called on caregivers, patients and the public to internalise the advocacy for the good of the society.

A Consultant Cardiothoracic Surgeon, Dr. Stanley Okugbo, in a presentation, said the ailment also known as blood clot, is the number one silent killer of patients.

He noted that, “VTE is common and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in hospitalised medically ill and surgical cancer patients.”

According to him, 55 to 60 per cent of VTE cases occur during or following hospitalisation, adding that two in four people in the hospital would die from causes related to blood clots.

Okugbo said thrombosis usually forms in the extremities (hands and legs), pointing out that knowledge of the sickness could aid prevention.

He listed some of the symptoms to include swelling of legs and arms that comes without warning, pains and soreness when walking or standing, warm or hot sensation in the area that hurts.

However, in many instances, there might not be signs at all.

Okugbo said those at risk include the elderly, those with serious health issues, those on birth control pills, people suffering from obesity and those with high cholesterol levels.

He said steps in the prevention of thrombosis include: to avoid sitting for too long or too much and engaging in regular exercises.