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Mandela’s people who kill black Africans (2)

By Karshima Shilgba
06 May 2015   |   12:02 am
THIS new wave of xenophobic attacks on black Africans resident in South Africa by their fellow black hosts is one that will not leave Africa the same. There must be severe consequences. The stench of black South Africans has gone upwards, and now shall that nation begin to fall behind so terribly before Africa and…

THIS new wave of xenophobic attacks on black Africans resident in South Africa by their fellow black hosts is one that will not leave Africa the same. There must be severe consequences. The stench of black South Africans has gone upwards, and now shall that nation begin to fall behind so terribly before Africa and the world. I am so convinced, and I speak boldly this way. He that pays back good with evil, evil shall never depart from his household.

South Africa is sick. I call on the African Union (AU) to consider a set of appropriate sanctions that will affect not only South African businesses and government, but also directly affect adversely her people. And Nigeria must lead the way. We must send a strong message that Africa will never tolerate such un-African conduct from any people on the continent. Apologies and empty promises by the South African government will certainly not suffice.

If the Jonathan government cannot lead in this move, I call on President-elect, Muhammadu Buhari, to make clear in no uncertain terms that there will be severe consequences. It does not matter whether Nigerians lost their lives in the attacks or not; what is important is that our African brothers and sisters are being maimed in an ungrateful nation, having their hard-earned wealth destroyed or taken away from them.

First, there must be a recall of all African diplomats from South Africa and expulsion of South African diplomats from the rest of Africa. Second, there must be demand for full reparations to be paid by the South African government to the victims and their families for loss of lives and property (This will eat into the commonwealth of South Africa that should have gone to the mad gangs). Third, until those reparations are accurately calculated and fully paid, all South African companies doing business in African countries should be sanctioned (there are many ways of doing this). Here in Nigeria, the South African cable television company, DSTV, has increased rates even against the ruling of a court of law. DSTV’s days in Nigeria should be numbered. We have a rising competitor in the Nigerian Star Times cable television company. DSTV’s monopoly in Africa must be focused on now and stopped one way and another.

The South-African MTN makes huge profits in Nigeria and other African countries. Appropriate sanctions must be applied, and let black South Africans keep those jobs they claim their African brethren are taking from them, and let the rest of the continent keep their markets. More South African companies (including their airlines) should be targeted. Never again must the rest of Africa be content with mere apologies from South African emissaries like Bishop Tutu.

President-elect Buhari said that the world would soon feel Nigeria’s leadership once more as she leads in solving the world’s problems such as terrorism, economic deprivation and climate change. His voice will certainly be heard on this xenophobia menace. Never again shall the black leader watch idly as such madness runs wild on our continent. We are one people, and must apply the rod where there is any misbehavior on the continent. If South Africa hopes to join Nigeria in solving African problems, she must put her house in order as Nigeria is doing.

President Zuma must not give Africans cause to believe he is incapable of providing leadership to his people. We have had enough of the insults. Africa must wield the big stick. I have taken note, considered it, and spoken.

•Concluded.
•Shilgba wrote via shilgba@yahoo.com