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Emma Nyra drops ‘Love Vs Money, tells her story

By Daniel Anazia
13 August 2016   |   2:08 am
Yes people rise and fall, but the ability rise after the fall is what matter most. The foregoing is Emma Nyra’s story of triumph. Emma had the most ignominious of exits when she left her Made Men Music Group.
Emma Nyra

Emma Nyra

“Rejoice not over me, O my enemy; when I fall, I shall rise; when I sit in darkness, the Lord will be a light to me,” Micah 7:8 says.

Yes people rise and fall, but the ability rise after the fall is what matter most. The foregoing is Emma Nyra’s story of triumph. Emma had the most ignominious of exits when she left her Made Men Music Group.

According to romours, her entrance and survival in the music label was linked to the whims and emotions of the label boss, Ubi Franklin, who allegedly abused her physically and verbally.

Though debilitating and ugly, the exit was necessary. Emma relocated to her family home in the US, where she retreated; recuperate before returning to Nigeria last December.

Her stay in the US was fruitful, as she bonded with family, spent time away from the drama on Nigerian blogs, avoided all the reminders of her pain, and the triggers of her sorrow. The leave was necessary and far different from the holidays that she had previously taken.

Thursday, August 4, 2016, she dropped a new EP, bearing a conceptual title of ‘Love VS Money’. The new project explores the correlation between both pursuits. Utilising synths and production from a number of engineers, Emma leans heavily towards the financials on Make money, an inspiration from the first half of her Nigerian career, where she did mix her pursuit of success, with romance with Ubi Franklin.

The thematic consistency is the strongest point of this work. For isolation of the two facets, there is reggaeton romance in Drop it, and obstinate resistance of love in the thumping Highlife cut – One chance.

Rich guitar strings from Fiokee add colour to probing ballad of Love of the money. However, the powering element is her storytelling and her ability to own the local delivery and pidgin flow. There is the existence of that struggle between money and love. Vex is a tiring girl-power plod under poorly done R&B.

Following the welcome break and familiarity of For my matter, featuring Patoranking, the first of two remixes worthy of being called Emma’s finest moments, the record’s last track and second half shines by the power of Banky W’s brilliant verse.

Emma scored major points by executing the theme via admirable songwriting, but the lack of punch and a resonating connection in the melodies draw back this EP. Regardless, she continues to find herself and grow again organically by releasing music, and embracing her efforts.