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I nearly gave up on music – Adekunle Gold

By Chinonso Ihekire
30 July 2022   |   2:40 am
When the American rap veteran, Prodigy, one-half of the American superstar duo Mobb Deep, unveiled his crisis with Sickle Cell Anaemia in 2013, many music lovers were not just saddened

When the American rap veteran, Prodigy, one-half of the American superstar duo Mobb Deep, unveiled his crisis with Sickle Cell Anaemia in 2013, many music lovers were not just saddened, but awe-struck at the intentionalism that skeletoned most of his releases before and around that time.

Now, as Nigerian Afro-RnB/Pop-fusion superstar, Adekunle Gold, revealed his own crisis with the illness, many Nigerians are once again bathed in the same despair as before. 

Yet, if there is anything Adekunle Gold is known for, it is his radicalism. The 35-year-old musician and father of one have assured Nigerians of his effervescent drive to survive, despite his decade-old struggle with the illness. 

In a passionate newsletter, the musician revealed intimate moments of his adolescence, when he was encumbered with health challenges and on the verge of quitting music, adding that he was able to draw inspiration from God to persevere on his journey. 

“I was born with sickle cell disease. It was life and death, it was physical, mental, financial… you name it and I went through it all. It was tough, painful and frustrating. I lived with a sickness, no one around me understood; I lived with restrictions all my childhood.

“I wasn’t able to join some of the most minor child play and liberating activities like going out in the rain. The times when I insisted and rebelled against my parents’ orders and went out in the rain, I would end up having a crisis.

“I begged God to take my life because I couldn’t understand what I did to deserve the pain my body and mind were under. As usual, with the sickle crisis after some days, the pain subsided and God asked me; ‘That end you begged me for, do you still want it?’ Of course, I said no, and that was when everything changed for me.

“That was when I realised that I had been given another opportunity to live my dreams and to show those that mocked me that sickle cell anaemia was never going to end me, that it was never going to hold me back from my dreams and aspirations,” he said in his newsletter. 

The singer, who recently released his studio album dubbed, Catch Me If You Can, in February, has been making the rounds with his follow-up songs. 

His latest smash hit dubbed, 5 Star, chronicles the singer’s evolution through his sickle cell crisis down to his early days as a Fuji-fusion Afro-pop act, and now one of the major exports in African music scene. 
5 Star is across all digital streaming platforms. 

 

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